Hungary

Grape Types

Susceptible to raisining and noble rot (known as aszú in Hungary's Tokaji), this full-bodied, high acid quality grape is the major partner in the blend with Hárslevelú which makes up Tokaji, the rich, long-lived wines of the Tokaj region in Hungary, now undergoing a revival thanks to western investments and the legendary winemaker Istvan Szepsy, who also makes a very classy, full-bodied dry version.
Also known as "feuille de tilleul", this is Tokaj region’s other important autochtone grape variety after Furmint. The bunches are long, loose, less prone to botrytis than Furmint, its berries are full of characteristic flavours. Hárslevelu wines are mainly pear, grapefruit, dill aromas, paired with nice acidity, also with elegant almond and sometimes with smooth acacia honey notes.
There are four main varieties of Muscat, the finest being Muscat à Petits Grains, followed by Muscat of Alexandria, then Muscat Hamburg and the lesser Muscat Ottonel. Renowned for its grapey aromatic character, Muscat is the great Mediterranean vine of antiquity, producing a variety of white wine styles, from the full-bodied dry whites of Alsace, to the sweet, fortified Muscats of Beaumes de Venise, Rivesaltes and Frontignan, to the lightly sparkling Moscato d’Asti wines of Piedmont that make for enthralling, refreshing aperitif or after dinner drinking.