Chardonnay, High Eden, 2016

  Mountadam

Contains Sulphites.

About Mountadam

Established in 1972 as one of Australia's pioneer Chardonnay producers, Mountadam was founded by the late David Wynn, without question one of the most significant contributors to the Australian wine industry and an important part of the Mountadam story. Amongst his many achievements, David Wynn is credited with the invention of the wine cask; he founded Wynn's Coonawarra Estate and transformed Coonawarra reds during the 1960s and '70s. In selecting the land for the Mountadam vineyard, Wynn was the first to recognise the potential of a cool, elevated site to produce wines of great elegance and structure, chosing an area high above the Eden Valley, which he named High Eden. At 550m above sea level, Mountadam is in fact the most elevated vineyard in South Australia. Current owner David Brown bought the estate in 2006 and one of many significant investments included the instalment of Con Moshos as head winemaker, following a distinguished 23-year career making fine wines at Petaluma. The Eden Valley wines are gently made and lean towards cool climate, old world charm, the Barossa valley wines veer more towards new world generosity and roundness.

Appellation: Barossa Valley

With some of the oldest plantings of Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre in Australia the Barossa Valley is perhaps the most famous wine region in Australia. The warm valley floor and scarcity of water, coupled with incredibly old, dry farmed vines produces some of Australias most powerful reds.

Grape Type: Chardonnay

Chardonnay is one of the most widely-grown and versatile of all white grape varieties. As a relatively neutral grape, it offers a near transparent map of winemaking style, climate and terroir. It is the ideal grape variety for Burgundy, where it serves to mirror the complex nuances of the myriad of terroirs found in this hallowed land. Chardonnay produces a variety of wines from the minerally and unoaked styles found in Chablis, the fatter nuttier examples in Meursault, to the tropical fruit-driven versions found in the New World. It is also the major grape variety in Champagne, where it produces lively floral wines, namely in the Côte de Blancs. It can be found throughout Europe and the New World thanks to its versatility. As a non-aromatic variety, it has an affinity with oak, whether new or used, French or American.