Austria

Grape Types

Blaufrankisch (aka Lemberger) is a black-skinned grape grown across Europe but most significantly in Austria and Hungary, Tiny quantities are also grown in the United States, most notably in New York's Finger Lakes but also in various parts of Washington (the Rattlesnake Hills, Horse Heaven Hills, Yakima Valley), and such far-flung states as California, Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Colorado. The common feature in Blaufrankisch wines from all of these places is a fruit-forward profile with aromas of spiced black cherries.

In Austria, Blaufrankisch is the second most popular red-wine variety behind Zweigelt – a crossing of Blaufrankisch with Austria's other signature red variety, Saint-Laurent. It is grown in almost every Austrian wine region to some extent, but its stronghold is unquestionably Burgenland where approximately 2632 hectares (6504 acres) were cultivated in 2015.
Chardonnay is one of the most widely-grown and versatile of all white grape varieties. As a relatively neutral grape, it offers a near transparent map of winemaking style, climate and terroir. It is the ideal grape variety for Burgundy, where it serves to mirror the complex nuances of the myriad of terroirs found in this hallowed land. Chardonnay produces a variety of wines from the minerally and unoaked styles found in Chablis, the fatter nuttier examples in Meursault, to the tropical fruit-driven versions found in the New World. It is also the major grape variety in Champagne, where it produces lively floral wines, namely in the Côte de Blancs. It can be found throughout Europe and the New World thanks to its versatility. As a non-aromatic variety, it has an affinity with oak, whether new or used, French or American.