Château Berliquet, Grand Cru Classé, 2017

  Château Berliquet

Château Berliquet, Grand Cru Classé

After many years being tended by Nicolas Thienpont, Berliquet is now being managed by another Nicolas, Monsieur Audebert of Canon and Rauzan Segla fame. The Wertheimer family recently purchased this superb clay/limestone plot between Canon and Belair Monange. The 2017 is the new team's first foray with this terroir and they opted for a cautious approach to picking and vinifications. The result is very impressive, although one senses this is very much a work in progress. Vivid crimson fruit, pure tayberry interwoven with minerals and liquorice. The palate is intense, vibrant and flavoursome with a real sense of its limestone terroir. Definitely one to watch!

Contains Sulphites.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.

Grape Blend: Cab. Sauvignon | Cab. Franc

Cabernet Sauvignon is often packed full of cedar herb and blackcurrant fruit notes leaning towards musk, pencil lead and cigar-box in its home region of Bordeaux. Its deep-colour, assertive tannins and affinity with oak allow the wines to improve in bottle over years if not decades. Cabernet Franc is grown predominantly in Bordeaux and the Loire, boasting fine red fruit and herb flavours, crisp acids and fine tannins, when both ripe they can form stunningly authoritative, sophisticated wines. This blend has been experimented with successfully in the warmer environs of the Languedoc, where it can yield excellent reds and rosés.