Château de Fargues, Sauternes, 2009

  Château De Fargues

Château de Fargues, Sauternes

De Fargues made a quick harvest in order not to pick grapes with too much richness in them, starting at the end of September and finishing on the 17th October. Yields were a healthy 17hl/ha well above the 11/ha average, so this is a vintage of quantity and quality. The wine shows an impressive richness and complexity, intense honeyed citrus character with faint touches of caramelised demerara sugar, ripe almost approaching exotic flavours of peach and nectarine but with supporting freshness. 138 g/l residual sugar.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château De Fargues

De Fargues is located in the appellation of Sauternes.

Appellation: Sauternes

Three grape varieties are planted: Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle. Sémillon is the principal grape, because it is especially susceptible to noble rot, Sauvignon is used for its naturally high acidity, whilst tiny proportions of the capricious Muscadelle are used for aromatic qualities. Sweet wine has been made here at least since the late 18th century. Its position is unique, close to two rivers, the broad Garonne and its small tributary, the Ciron. In autumn, the cool Ciron waters flow into the warmer tidal Garonne, evening mists develop that envelop the vineyards until late morning the following day, after the sun has burnt the mist away all that is left is moisture on trhe grapes that encourages noble rot or Botrytis cinerea. This fungus attacks grapes, causing them to shrivel, concentrating flavour sugars and acids. The wines were classified in 1855, the most prominent of which is Château Yquem, whose yields even in a vintage where noble rot is prominent, reach no more than 10 hl/ha.

Grape Blend: Semillon | Sauvignon Blanc

Semillon is blended with Sauvignon Blanc to produce the great sweet botrytis-affected wines of Bordeaux in Sauternes and Barsac, the Sauvignon adds aroma, fruit and freshness to the rich fleshy Semillon. Semillon is at its most illustrious in the humid atmosphere of Sauternes and Barsac, where it is susceptible to Botrytis rot, which helps concentrate the fruit sugars, acids and flavours, producing some of the most luscious, sweet long-lived wines in the world. The most renowned example is Château d'Yquem, though there are a plethora of estates throughout the region whose wines come close in quality.