Château Monbousquet, Grand Cru Classé, St Émilion, SHC, 2006

  Château Monbousquet

Château Monbousquet, Grand Cru Classé, St Émilion, SHC

"A blend of 60% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Franc, and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon, the 2006 possesses a dense ruby/purple color as well as a sweet perfume of espresso roast, damp earth, new oak, black cherries, and black currants. Medium to full-bodied with exceptional purity, surprising intensity, good texture, and sweet tannin in the finish, this unfiltered cuvee should drink well for 12-15 years. The residence and home estate of Chantal and Gerard Perse has once again turned in a serious effort. From sandy soils that have been largely dismissed as a good source for high quality wine production, Monbousquet, through extraordinary viticultural work, and doing everything right in the cellar, continues to turn out one of Bordeaux's finer wines."

92/100 - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate, Feb 2009

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Monbousquet

Chateau Perse’s acquisition of Monbousquet in 1993 has led to great things for this estate. It is located 500 metres south of Saint-Emilion and dates back a long way. Up until the arrival of Gerard Perse, the estate had produced a very creditable wine which ranked middle of the range of Saint-Emilion’s fine wines. The vineyard area extends 32 hectares with the grape varieties of approximately 60% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Franc and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon. Of the Grand vin Monbousquet there is a typically an annual production of 8,300 cases.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.

Grape Blend: Merlot | Cab. Sauvignon | Cab. Franc

Three of the classic Bordeaux varieties. A relatively rare blend for the right bank, where Cabernet Sauvignon plays a greater role than Cabernet Franc (Figeac being one of the few examples), while on the left bank this is most likely to crop up in the communes with cooler, damper soils such as St Estèphe.