Château Pavie, 1er Grand Cru Classé, St Emilion, 2001

  Château Pavie

£2900.00 for 12x75cl
3 btls
 
£2950.00 for 12x75cl
4 cs
 

"One of the candidates for wine of the vintage ... again, the 2001 Pavie, from a magnificent south-facing vineyard planted primarily on limestone soil, is a blend of 70% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Franc, and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon. After a six week maceration, it spent nearly 24 months in new oak prior to being bottled unfined and unfiltered. Some Bordeaux brokers think it might be even better than the 2000 Pavie, but I do not agree. The inky/ruby/purple-colored 2001 exhibits a tight but promising nose of crushed stones, a liqueur of blackberries, cherries, and black currants, and subtle smoke and licorice in the background. Powerful, with impressive elegance, fine harmony among its elements, a multi-layered texture, it has a finish that lasts for 50+ seconds. There is considerable tannin, but it is well-integrated. Give it 3-4 years, and drink it over the next two decades. A profound effort for the vintage, it is an example of a perfectionist proprietor pushing the envelope of quality."

96 Points - Robert Parker, Wine Advocate, June 2004

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Pavie

The ancient Pavie vineyard – going back at least as far as the 4th century AD – is located on the southern part of the Cote de Saint-Emilion (Saint-Emilion slope). Gerard Perse’s purchase of Pavie, in 1998, did wonders for the estate. Chateau Pavie is located on nearly 37 hectares of vines in a single block and is divided into three terroirs; the limestone plateau, deep clay soil, and at the foot of the slop – a sandy clay with slight amount of gravel. Chateau Pavie was upgraded to the ranks of 1er Grand Cru Classé ‘A’ in 2012 and now sits alongside, Ausone, Cheval Blanc and Angelus in the elite St Emilion classification. The wines are always massive, dense and tannic when tasted from barrel, but the class of the terroir typically starts to show through after five years in bottle.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.

Grape Blend: Merlot | Cab. Franc

Cabernet Franc with its unique herb infused red berry fragrance, adds backbone and acidity to the sensual, round favours of Merlot. This is as tried and tested combination used in the vast majority of serious St Emilion and Pomerol blends.