Château Pavie, 1er Grand Cru Classé, St Émilion, SHC, 2005

  Château Pavie

"Gérard Perse believes this is the greatest Pavie he’s made to date, although certainly I would argue that list includes the 2000, as well as the 2009 and 2010, among his superstars. This wine, which I had both in the 2005 horizontal report in the Wine Advocate, and at a mini-vertical with Perse at the restaurant Maison Boulud in Montreal, looks to be a 75- to 100-year wine. Dense, opaque purple to the rim, with a gorgeously promising nose of blackberries, cassis, graphite and cedar wood just beginning to emerge, it tastes more like a three-year-old than wine that is already a decade old. This beauty is intense and full-bodied, with magnificent concentration, a majestic mouthfeel and a total seamless integration of tannin, wood, alcohol, etc. Beautifully rich, full and multidimensional, this is a tour de force in winemaking and certainly one of the top dozen or so 2005 Bordeaux. Forget it for another 3-5 years and drink it over the following 50-100 years!


Pavie is widely acclaimed as one of Bordeaux’s greatest terroirs, of largely limestone and clay soils. Brilliantly situated with a sunny, southern exposure and exceptional drainage, Pavie potentially rivals nearby Ausone, the oldest and possibly the most famous estate in Bordeaux. Pavie’s other nearby neighbors include, Pavie-Macquin and Troplong-Mondot to the north, Larcis-Ducasse to the southeast and La Gaffelière and Saint-Georges Côte Pavie to the west.
Until 1978, previous owners rarely produced great wine, but of course that all changed with the acquisition of the 92-acre, single vineyard by Chantal and Gérard Perse. In short, they dramatically raised the quality. Currently, the vineyard is planted with 60% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Franc and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, but the actual blend for each vintage tends to possess slightly higher amounts of Merlot. A perfectionist, owner Gérard Perse is flexible with the percentage of new oak, as well as how long the wine is aged in cask. Great vintages can get 100% new oak and spend up to 32 months in barrel. Lesser years are bottled after 18 months and see at least 30% less new oak.

There is no fining or filtration. The resulting wine has been considered one of the superstars of Bordeaux since 1978."

100/100 - Robert Parker, RobertParker.com, August 2015

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Pavie

The ancient Pavie vineyard – going back at least as far as the 4th century AD – is located on the southern part of the Cote de Saint-Emilion (Saint-Emilion slope). Gerard Perse’s purchase of Pavie, in 1998, did wonders for the estate. Chateau Pavie is located on nearly 37 hectares of vines in a single block and is divided into three terroirs; the limestone plateau, deep clay soil, and at the foot of the slop – a sandy clay with slight amount of gravel. Chateau Pavie was upgraded to the ranks of 1er Grand Cru Classé ‘A’ in 2012 and now sits alongside, Ausone, Cheval Blanc and Angelus in the elite St Emilion classification. The wines are always massive, dense and tannic when tasted from barrel, but the class of the terroir typically starts to show through after five years in bottle.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.

Grape Blend: Merlot | Cab. Sauvignon | Cab. Franc

Three of the classic Bordeaux varieties. A relatively rare blend for the right bank, where Cabernet Sauvignon plays a greater role than Cabernet Franc (Figeac being one of the few examples), while on the left bank this is most likely to crop up in the communes with cooler, damper soils such as St Estèphe.