Château Troplong Mondot, 1er Grand Cru Classé, St Emilion, 2017

  Château Troplong Mondot

Bordeaux technical directors are like Premier League managers - flamboyant, highly sought after, prone to wild gesticulations and part of a never-ending merry-go-round. Cos d'Estournel's loss is very much Troplong Mondot's gain. The hugely talented and very affable Aymeric de Gironde has crossed the err Gironde and now is quite literally the king of the castle in St Emilion. He's got a very clear vision and we already like what he is doing. All good managers need coaching staff, so Aymeric has brought in Thomas Duclos as a consultant oenologist. We really like the change, this is dialed down, it is still massive, the terroir here naturally produces big wines, but it is red fruited, pure, elegant, fresh, restrained, all things we don't naturally associate with recent Troplongs. The nose has a gentle spice, notes of fragrant plums and cherry. On the palate the fruit is generous, there is plenty of volume and lavish fruit interspersed with fine minerals. A tannic spine gives purpose and direction. This is a vast improvement and we're sure there will be more to come... 14.2% vol, 85% Merlot, 13% Cabernet Sauvignon and 2% Cabernet Franc.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Troplong Mondot

Alexandre Valette, a Parisian vintner, bought the estate crafted by Raymond Troplong. He already owned Château La France in Fronsac and would soon acquire Château Pavie. In 1980 Alexandre’s great grand daughter, Christine, took over the estate and was joined, 10 years later, by her husband, Xavier Pariente. Together they continue to improve and embellish the vineyard, cellar and chateau. This hard work and their efforts proved worthwhile when in 2006 Troplong Mondot was awarded 1er Grand Cru Classé status. Troplong-Mondot overlooks the whole of Saint-Émilion and with its thirty-three (33) hectares, it is one of the biggest estates in the appellation of Saint-Émilion. Generally the soil of Saint-Émilion is clay and limestone based but Troplong Mondot is lucky enough to have special silex and chalk sediments which help to give the wine its lustrous hue and its rich concentration. The vineyard is managed in the traditional manner and neither weed killers, chemical fertilisers nor insecticides are used. These wines are powerful and well-structured with rich complex tannins, which open with time to deep aromas of truffle and blackberry.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.

Grape Blend: Merlot | Cab. Sauvignon | Cab. Franc

Three of the classic Bordeaux varieties. A relatively rare blend for the right bank, where Cabernet Sauvignon plays a greater role than Cabernet Franc (Figeac being one of the few examples), while on the left bank this is most likely to crop up in the communes with cooler, damper soils such as St Estèphe.