Ruchottes Chambertin, Grand Cru, Non OC, 2002

  Armand Rousseau

Contains Sulphites.

About Armand Rousseau

The success of a small group of growers (Domaine Rousseau among them) as one of the pioneers of Domaine bottling in the 1930s, paved the way for a great surge in quality. With the future looking rosy as several young growers start to take back plots of land from négociants, we have a lot to thank them for. Staggeringly, a quarter of Charles Rousseau’s land consists of Villages and Premier Cru sites; the rest are Grand Cru. The wines are now made by Charles's son, Eric, in the traditional way: fermented in open top vat, aged for 18 months in cask and bottled without filtration.

Appellation: Ruchottes-Chambertin Grand Cru

Ruchottes-Chambertin is a small Grand Cru within the Gevrey Chambertin commune spanning 3.50ha. The soils are poor, rocky and limestone based which results in wines of a racy, mineral, taut character which can be extremely fine indeed and, whilst a little reserved when young, flesh out well with age. Some of the best examples are from Mugneret, Esmonin, Roumier and Rousseau, the last of these owns in its entirety the outstanding monopole Clos des Ruchottes, covering 1.06ha. within the Ruchottes Chambertin vineyard.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.