Santenay, Les Charmes, 2016

  Bachelet Monnot

Contains Sulphites.

About Bachelet Monnot

In January 2005, after years of travelling France and the rest of the world gaining vital wine-making experience two budding young vignerons, brothers Marc and Alexandre Bachelet, set up this Domaine that spans 10 hectares over the Maranges, Santenay and Puligny-Montrachet communes. With a buring desire to work with nature to make the finest possible wines, Marc and Alexandre adopt a very natural labour-intensive approach to wine-making. Soils are ploughed, vine health careful monitored, herbicides are forbidden and strict de-budding is carried out to limit yields, whilst all grapes are hand picked at optimum ripeness. This Domaine is a rapidly rising star. 50% new oak is employed for Grand Crus and the red Maranges whilst a little less is used for the 1er Crus. The wines are aged through two winters bottling early or late winter depending on the vintage and the appellation.

Appellation: Santenay

A village at the southern end of the Côte de Beaune, south of Chassagne-Montrachet, producing red wines and less frequently whites. The heavy marl rich and clay soils are suited to producing red wines, which are usually powerful though can tend towards the reustic. The best examples have body, weight and plenty of fruit to cover the sometimes rustic tannins. The best wines are capable of ageing well. The finest vineyards are considered to be the premiers crus La Comme, Clos de Tavannes, and Les Gravières, La Maladière, Clos Rousseau on the far border of Santenay. Vincent Girardin is probably the most famous and prolific Santenay producer.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.