Corton, Grand Cru, 2017

  Bonneau Du Martray

The first impression is of something very neatly constructed, polished and smoothly textured. But there is a grip and structure here that belies this initial gloss, something quite serious and brooding that lies within. The fruit is clear and refreshing, notes of cherries and cherry stones, the finish is taut and tightens a little. The livelier edgier side of Corton.

Contains Sulphites.

About Bonneau Du Martray

Bonneau du Martray own the highest proportion of vines on the hill of Corton, and since the early 1990s has been a benchmark Burgundian Domaine. Heavy pruning and green harvesting mean that yields are astonishingly low and, much to the amazement of neighbours, they are usually the first to harvest by several days. After elevage in barriques, these tantalisingly fine, mineral wines undergo the very lightest of fi ltrations before being bottled.

After two tiny vintages, Bonneau du Martray could have been forgiven for thinking mother nature was finally returning some of what she had taken over the previous two years. Up until the end of June 2014 the season had looked so promising, culminating in a uniform and quick flowering that promised a decent-sized crop. However on the 28th June the dreaded hail struck, wiping out nearly half of the crop in two minutes. Fortunately this was too early to affect quality and although quantities are once again heavily reduced they are, at least, up on the past two vintages. A very fine September insured the domaine could harvest beautifully ripe, concentrated grapes, with minimal sorting required, between the 16th and 21st. It is clear we have a great white vintage on our hands here, and Bonneau du Martray have produced the goods, making a white of impeccable balance, verve and style.

Appellation: Corton

Corton is the only red wine Grand Cru in the côte de beaune and covers several vineyards which are known as either Corton or as Corton hyphenated with their individual names, such as Bressandes or Clos du Roi. The style of the wine will depend on exactly where the vines are situated. Corton is an early-ripening area and the Pinot Noir grapes are usually the first to be harvested in the Côte d'Or. The vast majority of white wine that comes from the hill of Corton is Corton-Charlemagne though there is a miniscule amount of white Corton made.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.