Corton Charlemagne, Grand Cru, 2006

  Bruno Clair

"A ripe and moderately high-toned nose of ripe green fruit and white flower aromas complements the rich, intense, tautly muscled and full-bodied flavors that possess fine power and length on the bone dry finish where, similar to the Pernand, a touch of pain grillé can be found." Allen Meadows, Burghound

Contains Sulphites.

About Bruno Clair

Bruno Clair started his own domaine in 1979 with small holdings in Marsannay, Fixin, Morey and Savigny Dominode. Alongside this sat his family's Clair-Dau estate, one of the great Burgundian domaines, however following the death of his grandfather Joseph Clair family disaggreements sadly lead to its dismantling in 1985. The following year, to add to his own small domaine, Bruno was entrusted with the vineyards of his parents, brothers and sisters which included those of Clos de Bèze, Cazetiers, Clos St-Jacques, Vosne-Romanée, Clos du Fonteny and Chambolle-Musigny.

Bruno Clair’s wings are spread widely over the Côte d’Or covering nine appellations in total. Bruno, first and foremost, is a vigneron and, with the help of winemaker Philippe Brun, produces some of Burgundy’s purest examples, adopting an approach that involves back-breaking vineyard work and minimal intervention winemaking, using a mixture of large old wooden foudres and smaller barriques for the long slow ageing process. New oak, though used, is kept to a minimum - rarely going above 40% even for the Grands Crus. The estate is renowned, in particular, for its excellent value Marsannays, stunning Gevreys and old vines Savigny Cuvées. Though not always a fan of whole bunch, Bruno will, from time to time, use them in certain vintages to aide more gentle extractions. These are high-toned, vivid red Burgundies of great purity.

Appellation: Corton-Charlemagne


A white wine Grand Cru appellation, Corton-Charlemagne stretches in a narrow band around the top of the Corton hill from Ladoix-Serrigny, through Aloxe-Corton to Pernand-Vergelesses. Marginally higher cooler and with whiter spoils than the red wine vineyards of Corton, Corton Charlemagne is ideally suited to the production of white wine. The stony soils here impart a very specific flinty and mineral character displayed by most Corton Charlemagne. The body, style and ripeness of the wine can vary according to where the vineyards are situated - the east-facing vines facing Ladoix tend to produce the most mineral wines,whereas the due south Aloxe-facing side result in the richest, ripest wines. Corton-Charlemagne is a large and underrated Grand Cru vineyard, so a good example can offer the best value drinking of any Grand Cru white Burgundy.

Grape Type: Chardonnay

Chardonnay is one of the most widely-grown and versatile of all white grape varieties. As a relatively neutral grape, it offers a near transparent map of winemaking style, climate and terroir. It is the ideal grape variety for Burgundy, where it serves to mirror the complex nuances of the myriad of terroirs found in this hallowed land. Chardonnay produces a variety of wines from the minerally and unoaked styles found in Chablis, the fatter nuttier examples in Meursault, to the tropical fruit-driven versions found in the New World. It is also the major grape variety in Champagne, where it produces lively floral wines, namely in the Côte de Blancs. It can be found throughout Europe and the New World thanks to its versatility. As a non-aromatic variety, it has an affinity with oak, whether new or used, French or American.