Bourgogne, La Croix Blanche, Rouge, 2016

  Cecile Tremblay

An excellent Bourgogne that really shows the stylish characteristics of its home communes of Chambolle and Vosne. Such lovely, silky dark fruit with notes of stone and spice. Suave but bright and tense, tremendous depth and weight for a Bourgogne. But there is nothing forced here just great clarity and ripeness of fruit. Seductive, mouth-watering flavours of forest berry, cherry and bramble. Bourgogne of superb pedigree that comes from vines aged between 30-70 years-old planted in the Chambolle and Vosne communes.

Contains Sulphites.

About Cecile Tremblay

Rising star Cécile Tremblay, Henri Jayer’s grand-niece, took the reins of her family domaine in 2003, working a total of three hectares of the family’s six hectares. As with all top growers the attention to detail here is in the vineyards. Cécile tends her vines with the utmost care and respect for terroir and the environment, practicing organic and biodynamic farming. In her own words "the grape bunches are my English roses, the vineyards my garden." To ensure low yields (between 25 and 35 hl/ha depending on the vintage) pruning is short and excess buds are removed. The wines undergo a cold prefermentation maceration and are then fermented either with no, some or all of the stalks depending on the wine and the vintage. There is the minimum of intervention here with ageing taking place in oak barrel (20 to 75 % new wood depending on the wine) for 15 to 18 months. These wines are a beautiful marriage of vivid, individual terroir characteristics and silky sensuality.

Appellation: Bourgogne

Bourgogne or Burgundy is a wide-ranging generic appellation in eastern France that has been planted with the vine at least since Roman times, the earliest archaeological evidence coming from 2nd Century A.D. The region, now spanning up to 28,000 hectares, owes a lot to the work of Cistercian Monks in the 11th and 12th Centuries, particularly in the Côte d'Or, who were responsible for identifying some of the finest vineyard plots still in existence today. The appellation is large, stretching between the cities of Auxerre in the North and Lyon in the south and includes Chablis, the Côte d'Or (from where hail some of the world's finest examples of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir), the Chalonnais, Maconnais and Beaujolais. Chardonnay is the main white grape planted, though there is still a fair amount of Aligote to be found if an ever decreasing amount, as well as tiny proportions of Pinot Blanc and Pinot Beurrot. For quality reds Pinot Noir is the dominant grape and the only permitted variety for the "Bourgogne Rouge" appellation controlee, there are plantings of Gamay too, though, which can be blended with a minimum one third Pinot Noir to make "Bourgogne Passetoutgrain." There is also the rarely seen Bourgogne Grand Ordinaire, which may include the Pinot Noir, Gamay, César, and Tressot varieties. This appellation also exists for whites, allowing a blend of Chardonnay, Aligoté and Melon de Bourgogne. Being such a big area style can vary enormously: From the steely, minerally white Bourgognes near Chablis to the rounder, more buttery offerings in the Maconnais. Very fine and extremely good value examples of red and white Bourgognes are made by many of the high quality estates in the Côte d'Or, the designated "Bourgogne" vineyards here being on the flatter less well-drained terrain the other side of the RN74 road to the villages and 1er Cru appellations. Some Bourgogne Rosé can also made be made but this is a tiny fraction of the red and white wine production.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.