Marsannay, Champs Salomon, SHC, 2012

  Charles Audoin

Marsannay, Champs Salomon, SHC

Contains Sulphites.

Appellation: Marsannay

The northernmost appellation of the Côte de Nuits. Marsannay is the only Burgundian commune that boasts appellation contrôlée status for red, white, and rosé. The appellation also includes the vineyards of Couchey and Chenove. Prior to 1987, the wines were sold simply as "Bourgogne" followed by the "Marsannay" or "Rosé de Marsannay" designation. The Pinot Noir Rosé is a speciality of the village pioneered in 1919 by Joseph Clair, it can offer considerable pedigree and quality. The reds, when made properly, can be some of Burgundy's best value reds, full of Pinot Noir character, some terroir complexity they are usually relatively light, certainly lighter than those of neighbour Fixin, but offer very pleasureable drinking for within 5-6 years of the vintage. The whites are made from Chardonnay but some Pinot Blanc can be found, too, they are plump fruity and sometimes quite exotic examples of White Burgundy, and, again, can be extremely good value.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.