Bourgogne, Terroir d'Exception, 2016

  Château de Meursault

£180.00 for 6x75cl
10 cs, 1 btl
 
£375.00 for 6x150cl
6 cs, 5 btls
 

Perhaps even stronger minerality than the 2015, the oak is a little less visible too. Super bright flavours of crystallised lemons and salted citrus rind, finishing on savoury notes of dry stones. Long focused and brimful of personality. This hails from a plot of 40 years-old vines between Albert Grivault’s Clos des Perrières and Perrières itself. A premier cru site if ever you saw one but for the fact that it was a quarry up until 1977, which has meant that it was never classed as such. Crisp clean citrus and stone influenced flavours that really do speak of Perrières - this is a Bourgogne that truly rises above its status.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château de Meursault

A wonderful, historic Domaine that probably has Côte de Beaune’s most fabulous cellars. Château de Meursault has for a long time been on the tourist trail and is the impressive venue for the famous Paulee de Meursault in November. However this will soon be a name on the Burgundy lover’s radar, too. 2012 was the first vintage that Stephane Follin-Arbelet started running the estate. Brother of Frank Follin-Arbelet and former director of Bouchard, Stephane knows a thing or two about what it means to make top quality Burgundy and what it takes to manage a large estate. He is on a single-minded mission to make it one of the great Domaines of Burgundy. The winemaking is respectful to terroir, new oak ranges from 30-40% and the wines are aged for 15-18 months in the enormous, cool, vaulted cellars underneath the Château. A new star of Burgundy is born.

Appellation: Bourgogne

Bourgogne or Burgundy is a wide-ranging generic appellation in eastern France that has been planted with the vine at least since Roman times, the earliest archaeological evidence coming from 2nd Century A.D. The region, now spanning up to 28,000 hectares, owes a lot to the work of Cistercian Monks in the 11th and 12th Centuries, particularly in the Côte d'Or, who were responsible for identifying some of the finest vineyard plots still in existence today. The appellation is large, stretching between the cities of Auxerre in the North and Lyon in the south and includes Chablis, the Côte d'Or (from where hail some of the world's finest examples of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir), the Chalonnais, Maconnais and Beaujolais. Chardonnay is the main white grape planted, though there is still a fair amount of Aligote to be found if an ever decreasing amount, as well as tiny proportions of Pinot Blanc and Pinot Beurrot. For quality reds Pinot Noir is the dominant grape and the only permitted variety for the "Bourgogne Rouge" appellation controlee, there are plantings of Gamay too, though, which can be blended with a minimum one third Pinot Noir to make "Bourgogne Passetoutgrain." There is also the rarely seen Bourgogne Grand Ordinaire, which may include the Pinot Noir, Gamay, César, and Tressot varieties. This appellation also exists for whites, allowing a blend of Chardonnay, Aligoté and Melon de Bourgogne. Being such a big area style can vary enormously: From the steely, minerally white Bourgognes near Chablis to the rounder, more buttery offerings in the Maconnais. Very fine and extremely good value examples of red and white Bourgognes are made by many of the high quality estates in the Côte d'Or, the designated "Bourgogne" vineyards here being on the flatter less well-drained terrain the other side of the RN74 road to the villages and 1er Cru appellations. Some Bourgogne Rosé can also made be made but this is a tiny fraction of the red and white wine production.

Grape Type: Chardonnay

Chardonnay is one of the most widely-grown and versatile of all white grape varieties. As a relatively neutral grape, it offers a near transparent map of winemaking style, climate and terroir. It is the ideal grape variety for Burgundy, where it serves to mirror the complex nuances of the myriad of terroirs found in this hallowed land. Chardonnay produces a variety of wines from the minerally and unoaked styles found in Chablis, the fatter nuttier examples in Meursault, to the tropical fruit-driven versions found in the New World. It is also the major grape variety in Champagne, where it produces lively floral wines, namely in the Côte de Blancs. It can be found throughout Europe and the New World thanks to its versatility. As a non-aromatic variety, it has an affinity with oak, whether new or used, French or American.