Clos de la Roche, Grand Cru, 2016

  Coquard Loison Fleurot

Clos de la Roche, Grand Cru

Contains Sulphites.

About Coquard Loison Fleurot

Things happen pretty fast in Burgundy. One day you’re flying under the radar as an unknown, the next you are in the spotlight being billed as the next big thing. The rise and rise of “CLF” as they have become known in the trade (let’s face it, it’s less of a mouthful) has been quite startling. Two years ago, we’d never heard of them. Apparently, there was a time when they were selling most of their wines in French supermarkets. Now they are being mentioned in the same breath as Burgundian Royalty.

The domaine itself is very impressive, boasting a high proportion of grands crus. When Thomas Colladot returned to the family estate in 2010, the ascent began. Thomas had previously been learning his trade under the tutelage of Sebastien Cathiard. He has since refined his own style, still being an advocate of purity and freshness, his wines tend to be lighter and more transparent than Domaine Cathiards, and he is judicial in his use of new oak. The results are turning heads. We are delighted to offer a selection of his very successful 2015s.

Appellation: Clos de La Roche

Although Morey chose to append St-Denis (from the Clos St Denis) to its name , Clos de la Roche is probably the finest and most renowned vineyard in the commune, a large Grand Cru spanning 16.9ha. The soil is rich in marl and the micro climate warm, a combination that gives broad, ripe, rich and very opulent wines that can be particularly flattering when young, though they age very well. It is the flagship wine of Ponsot, but many other fine examples can be found from Leroy, Rousseau, Dujac and Louis Remy.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.