Mazis Chambertin, Grand Cru, 2017

  Denis Mortet

A creaminess and breadth here but no heaviness at all. Sensational flavours of plum, creme de framboise and bramble with a redder
loganberry touch. Such class and polish, a stylish intensity of flavour. This glides serenely across the palate and haunts on the finish. Pure seduction. From a very well-located parcel of 50-60 year-old vines next door to Clos de Bèze. 25% whole bunch fermentation.

Contains Sulphites.

About Denis Mortet

Denis Mortet's death in the early part of 2006 was a tragedy that shook the wine world. He was able to make the 2005s and fortunately his talented son Arnaud was waiting in the wings to take over. Denis was already leaning towards making a more gentle style of Burgundy in 2006 and Arnaud seems to have even more whole-heartedly adopted this philosophy, moving closer to the wines of great uncle, Charles Rousseau. During fermantation, extraction is very light and much less new oak (no more than 40%) is employed during elevage. A domaine with enormous potential.

Appellation: Mazis-Chambertin

Mazis-Chambertin, also written Mazy-, comprises 12.59 ha and along with Latricières-Chambertin is considered to be one of the best Gevrey Grands Crus after Chambertin and Clos de Bèze. The wines can be very fine intense and powerful, they age well but are be more generous in their youth than either Chambertin and Clos de Bèze being less structured. Some of the more renowned producers are Dugat Py, Maume, Rousseau Esmonin and d'Auvenay.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. At their greatest they offer a lightness with intensity and are transparent enough to magnify the characteristics of the terroir in which they are grown. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, coastal California, Oregon, Hemel en Aarde in South Africa and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.