Pommard, Grand Clos des Epenots, 1er Cru, 2009

  Domaine de Courcel

Pommard, Grand Clos des Epenots, 1er Cru

Contains Sulphites.

Appellation: Pommard

A commune in Burgundy renowned for producing the most powerful and tannic red wines of the Côte de Beaune. A dearth of good producers actually in Pommard has perhaps meant that the commune has not always realised its true potential. There are some very fine examples from, amongst others, Comte Armand, however many of the best Pommards seem to be made from producers outside of the village. The cool, moist heavy clay soils result in strong, muscular wines designed for ageing which are deeper in colour and usually more structured than those of its neighbour, Volnay.

Pommard spans from the border of Beaune to, on the south side, the edge of Volnay. On the Beaune side, the finest vineyards are Les Pézerolles and Les Épenots, including the Clos des Épeneaux monopole of Comte Armand. Towards Volnay is Les Rugiens, wines from the lower section, known as Les Rugiens Bas, are considered to have the potential to be the communes best and there are those who feel it is justified elevation to Grand Cru status.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.