Morey St Denis, 2009

  Domaine des Lambrays

"A very fresh and high-toned yet notably ripe red berry fruit nose leads to delicious middle weight flavors that possess fine mid-palate concentration, vibrancy and excellent length and definition for a villages level wine. Worth a look as this is really quite good." Allen Meadows, Burghound

Contains Sulphites.

About Domaine des Lambrays

Clos des Lambrays was a vineyard established as early as 1365 and was elevated to Grand Cru status in 1981. This has become a benchmark Domaine for the Burgundy lover, producing subtle, pure Burgundies that are drinkable and generous without ever over stepping the mark. Largely traditional winemaking applies, bunches are fermented whole in open top tanks followed by ageing for 18 months in 50% new oak barrels. In 2014, LVMH bought the Clos des Lambrays and would no doubt be investing hugely in this new project, starting by keeping the longtime winemaker Thierry Brouin.

Appellation: Morey St-Denis

A commune in the Côte de Nuits district of Burgundy capable of producing excellent quality red wine, which is typically described as being a halfway house between its neighbours - the richer Gevrey-Chambertin and the lighter Chambolle-Musigny. There are four Grand Cru vineyards, from north to south: Clos de la Roche 16.9 ha, Clos St-Denis 6.6 ha, Clos des Lambrays 8.8 ha and the monopole Clos de Tart 7.5 ha, plus a small strip of Bonnes Mares overlapping from Chambolle Musigny. There are some good premier cru vineyards, among the best known include Les Ruchots, Clos de la Bussière (monopole of Georges Roumier), Les Millandes, Clos des Ormes, and Les Monts Luisants. The commune is also capable of producing excellent quality whites, but they are very rarely seen. Bruno Clair's En La Rue de Vergy is one example, another is Domaine Ponsot who produces a white from Chardonnay blended with a proportion of Pinot Blanc that had mutated from Pinot Noir vines.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.