Bienvenues Bâtard Montrachet, Grand Cru, 2010

  Leflaive

One of the most textured and pliable Grand Crus, the palate initially explodes with an attack of flowers and fruit, tensing up and closing a little on the mid-palate; this may need some time to unravel but the wine comes back in force on the finish, showing richness presence and great persistence. An old vine parcel planted in 1959; the oldest at the domaine.

Contains Sulphites.

About Leflaive

There is no doubt that Anne-Claude’s wines are going from strength to strength. The bio-dynamic revolution that she started in 1990 seems to have really got into its stride. Her opinion is that it takes about eight years for the effects of this complicated process to be seen, and she confirmed our beliefs that the acidity of the wines was getting better each year. These whites rate among the best Burgundy has to offer. The wines are typically barrel-fermented and aged for several months followed by at least 6 months in steel tank prior to bottling.

Appellation: Bienvenue-Bâtard-Montrachet

One of the smallest white Grands Crus, all 3.69 ha of Bienevnues-Bâtard-Montrachet lie in the commune of Puligny-Montrachet, situated in the north-east corner of Bâtard-Montrachet. The wines are more delicate than those of Chevalier or Bâtard, lacking the minerality of the former and the muscle of the latter. Bievenues is nevertheless justifiably a Grand Cru in its own right, the best examples are fine, generously-textured, fragrant and rich with great length of flavour.

Grape Type: Chardonnay

Chardonnay is one of the most widely-grown and versatile of all white grape varieties. As a relatively neutral grape, it offers a near transparent map of winemaking style, climate and terroir. It is the ideal grape variety for Burgundy, where it serves to mirror the complex nuances of the myriad of terroirs found in this hallowed land. Chardonnay produces a variety of wines from the minerally and unoaked styles found in Chablis, the fatter nuttier examples in Meursault, to the tropical fruit-driven versions found in the New World. It is also the major grape variety in Champagne, where it produces lively floral wines, namely in the Côte de Blancs. It can be found throughout Europe and the New World thanks to its versatility. As a non-aromatic variety, it has an affinity with oak, whether new or used, French or American.