Riesling, Junge Reben, Trocken, 2014

  August Kesseler

Pears, apple and greengage lead to a palate that has typical Rhine spice and richness. There is much less young vine character these days, moderate acidity and a certain textural presence. August's playful "young vine" cuvee is growing up.

Contains Sulphites.

About August Kesseler

Tasting Kesseler's Spatburgunders it is not hard to see why he is considered by many to be one of the very top Pinot Noir producers in the whole of Germany. The slate soils of the Assmannshauser Hollenberg vineyard, from where all his Pinot Noir comes from, are said to have been planted up to 1000 years ago, provide extremely good acidities, and are practially phylloxera resistant. Fermentation and ageing of the Pinots is carried out the Burgundian way and the resulting wines do not fail to impress; they are stylish, moreish and extremely pure expressions of Pinot Noir, regardless of context.
August has also swiftly gained a reputation for world class Riesling. In his own words “ I am a Mosel Fan, I like lightness and drinkability in the wines." The style of the wines are something of a halfway house between Mosel and Rheingau Rieslings, they retain great lightness of touch to go with their innate power. August’s approach is different to that many growers in this part of the Rheingau: The warmer sites around Rudesheim tend to be reserved for Grand Cru Dry wines, while the fruity sweeter wines mostly originate from the cooler terroirs around Lorch.

Appellation: Rheingau

7,700 acres along the northern side of the Rhine between Wiesbaden and Rüdesheim where the Riesling produces classic and substantial wines.

Grape Type: Riesling

One of the world’s noblest grape varieties, Riesling produces scented, refreshing, mineral wines from dry to lusciously sweet. Its bad reputation, tarnished by the cloying and completely unrelated Liebfraumilch, is one of the wine world’s great injustices. Its heartland is the steep Mosel and Rheingau valleys of Germany, where it produces floral spritzy off-dry to medium wines packed with lime and apple fruit or, when affected by botrytis, honeyed apricot characteristics. In Alsace, Austria’s Wachau and Germany’s Franken there are some exhilarating, complex dry versions that work very well with Oriental fusion foods, as well as some stunning sweet versions. Some superb lively fruit-forward styles are cropping up in New Zealand, Constantia in South Africa and the cooler parts of Australia and California.