Rudesheimer Berg Schlossberg, Spatburgunder, 2012

  August Kesseler

£430.00 for 6x75cl
1 btl
 
£150.00 for 1x150cl
4 cs
 

The steep south-facing berg Schlossberg soils are quartzite, with some slate and clay and as a result the grapes are regularly harvested up to two weeks ahead of those in Assmanshausen. The palate lacks the slate backbone of Hollenberg, being lusher, silkier, and composed of peach, red currant and red cherry. There is an extra dose of sunshine evident here, the generous flavours broad and mouth-filling, the finish long and spicy.

Contains Sulphites.

About August Kesseler

Tasting Kesseler's Spatburgunders it is not hard to see why he is considered by many to be one of the very top Pinot Noir producers in the whole of Germany. The slate soils of the Assmannshauser Hollenberg vineyard, from where all his Pinot Noir comes from, are said to have been planted up to 1000 years ago, provide extremely good acidities, and are practially phylloxera resistant. Fermentation and ageing of the Pinots is carried out the Burgundian way and the resulting wines do not fail to impress; they are stylish, moreish and extremely pure expressions of Pinot Noir, regardless of context.
August has also swiftly gained a reputation for world class Riesling. In his own words “ I am a Mosel Fan, I like lightness and drinkability in the wines." The style of the wines are something of a halfway house between Mosel and Rheingau Rieslings, they retain great lightness of touch to go with their innate power. August’s approach is different to that many growers in this part of the Rheingau: The warmer sites around Rudesheim tend to be reserved for Grand Cru Dry wines, while the fruity sweeter wines mostly originate from the cooler terroirs around Lorch.

Appellation: Rheingau

7,700 acres along the northern side of the Rhine between Wiesbaden and Rüdesheim where the Riesling produces classic and substantial wines.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.