Riesling, Trocken, 2016

  Okonomierat Rebholz

Another great value estate wine from Rebholz, just what you'd want from a dry Pfalz wine. At only 11.5% abv and 2 grams of residual sugar, this manages to be surprisingly powerful, bone dry and balanced. Plenty of taut fruit floods the palate, stone fruits muddled with wild herbs. The grapes for this are grown on a mixture of gravel and sandstone.

Contains Sulphites.

About Okonomierat Rebholz

A great name in German wine circles and the leading estate of the Pfalz, Okonomierat Rebholz represents the region at its most uncompromising, precise and pure. If the Pfalz is often known for producing full-bodied, fruit forward wines, Hansjorg Rebholz's wines come as a crisp pure breath of fresh air. Never chaptalising or de-acidifying, nor allowing his wines to soften through malolactic fermentation, the Rebholz style aims to be as transparent a translation of vintage and site as possible; the house style, honed now over three generations, is bone dry, crystal clear, pure and unadulterated. Possessing some of the finest vineyard sites in the Pfalz on a smorgasbord of different soils, Hansjorg and his team craft a broad range of wines. Riesling sits at the core making up 40% of the plantings, supported by some of Germany’s finest and most focussed Pinot Blancs, a concise selection of top level Spatburgunders and some truly classy, balanced Sekts. All of the dry white wines below are fermented and aged in steel, with a minimum of intervention, resting upon fine lees until bottling, which is done without fining and the lightest of filtrations. The results, naturally possessing high levels of CO2, are long, intense, pure wines that often require, and are always capable of, extended ageing.

Appellation: Pfalz

Formerly known as the Rheinpfalz, this region has 59,000 acres under vines. Rich wines reflect the warm climate of the south of Germany.

Grape Type: Riesling

One of the world’s noblest grape varieties, Riesling produces scented, refreshing, mineral wines from dry to lusciously sweet. Its bad reputation, tarnished by the cloying and completely unrelated Liebfraumilch, is one of the wine world’s great injustices. Its heartland is the steep Mosel and Rheingau valleys of Germany, where it produces floral spritzy off-dry to medium wines packed with lime and apple fruit or, when affected by botrytis, honeyed apricot characteristics. In Alsace, Austria’s Wachau and Germany’s Franken there are some exhilarating, complex dry versions that work very well with Oriental fusion foods, as well as some stunning sweet versions. Some superb lively fruit-forward styles are cropping up in New Zealand, Constantia in South Africa and the cooler parts of Australia and California.