Spatburgunder, Tradition, 2014

  Okonomierat Rebholz

Aromatically charged with cherry and almond blossom aromas, sweet wild berries and rock salt. Really impressive fruit presence but also wonderful transparency of flavours and tension for an entry level wine. There’s real character of Spatburgunder territory, and yet no noticeable oak whatsoever.

Contains Sulphites.

About Okonomierat Rebholz

A great name in German wine circles and the leading estate of the Pfalz, Okonomierat Rebholz represents the region at its most uncompromising, precise and pure. If the Pfalz is often known for producing full-bodied, fruit forward wines, Hansjorg Rebholz's wines come as a crisp pure breath of fresh air. Never chaptalising or de-acidifying, nor allowing his wines to soften through malolactic fermentation, the Rebholz style aims to be as transparent a translation of vintage and site as possible; the house style, honed now over three generations, is bone dry, crystal clear, pure and unadulterated. Possessing some of the finest vineyard sites in the Pfalz on a smorgasbord of different soils, Hansjorg and his team craft a broad range of wines. Riesling sits at the core making up 40% of the plantings, supported by some of Germany’s finest and most focussed Pinot Blancs, a concise selection of top level Spatburgunders and some truly classy, balanced Sekts. All of the dry white wines below are fermented and aged in steel, with a minimum of intervention, resting upon fine lees until bottling, which is done without fining and the lightest of filtrations. The results, naturally possessing high levels of CO2, are long, intense, pure wines that often require, and are always capable of, extended ageing.

Appellation: Pfalz

Formerly known as the Rheinpfalz, this region has 59,000 acres under vines. Rich wines reflect the warm climate of the south of Germany.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.