Westhofen, Brunnenhauschen, Abts E, Riesling, TBA, 2017

  Weingut Keller

£3090.00 for 6x37.5cl
1 cs
 
£2950.00 for 6x37.5cl
 

Not yet tasted

Contains Sulphites.

About Weingut Keller

One of Germany’s truly great estates, we are delighted to have been offering these wines since the 2007 vintage. Since the late eighties, Klaus Keller has rapidly gained a very serious reputation for making top flight German Riesling in both dry, fruity and sweet styles. More recently, Klaus’s son Klaus-Peter has joined the team after completing his wine-making studies at Geisenheim and is helping to drive quality forward even further. As with any top producer worth his salt, Keller believes good vineyard management is the key to success. Based in the Rhinehessen, where the wines have more generosity and richness than in the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer or even Nahe, the Kellers are able to produce some of Germany’s most complete dry wines in addition to wonderful fruity and sweet late harvest styles

Appellation: Rheinhessen

The Rheinhessen lies with the crook of the Rhine to the north and east, the Nahe to the west, Pfalz to the South and the Rheingau to the North over the river. Keller crafts his fabulous dry, fruity and sweet wines here, where the vines produce more generosity and richness than in the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer or even Nahe.

Grape Type: Riesling

One of the world’s noblest grape varieties, Riesling produces scented, refreshing, mineral wines from dry to lusciously sweet. Its bad reputation, tarnished by the cloying and completely unrelated Liebfraumilch, is one of the wine world’s great injustices. Its heartland is the steep Mosel and Rheingau valleys of Germany, where it produces floral spritzy off-dry to medium wines packed with lime and apple fruit or, when affected by botrytis, honeyed apricot characteristics. In Alsace, Austria’s Wachau and Germany’s Franken there are some exhilarating, complex dry versions that work very well with Oriental fusion foods, as well as some stunning sweet versions. Some superb lively fruit-forward styles are cropping up in New Zealand, Constantia in South Africa and the cooler parts of Australia and California.