Barolo, Percristina, 2001

  Domenico Clerico

Barolo, Percristina

This comes from the Mosconi Cru, a vineyard slope neighbouring the Ginestra with the same south east exposure. The powerful nature of the Mosconi wines sees them spend up to two years in French oak barriques. This must be the one of the best Percristina Clerico has made, voluptuous but fine, generous but complex. This oozes with ripe velvety berry and plum fruits with strong mineral and dark chocolate notes and touches of stone and spice, wrapped in rich satin-textured velvety tannins. The oak is beautifully integrated and fruit lifts the haunting finish with a real vivacity.

Contains Sulphites.

About Domenico Clerico

In 1977 Domenico Clerico decided to leave his job as a salesman in order to work full time in his family’s estate. After several experiments in the cellar, Domenico’s friends persuaded him to make wine on a permanent basis. Vineyards were purchased in some of the most interesting crus of Monteforte: Ginestra in 1983, Pajana in 1989 and the last, Mosconi, in 1985. Domenico, who tragically passed away earlier in July 2017, is of the region’s great legends, as an advocate for the modern Barolo winemaking philosophy of short maceration and ageing in barriques. The wines display polish, structure and - most importantly - balance.

Appellation: Barolo

Barolo is the greatest, most intense and expressive display of the Northern Italian grape variety Nebbiolo. The name is given to bottles from the Piedmont area, made exclusively from Nebbiolo, and coming from the five core towns of Barolo, La Morra, Serralunga d'Alba, Castiglione Falletto and Monforte d'Alba, along with certain other peripherary villages. The wines offer power, aromatics and longevity that is almost unmatched elsewhere in Italy, perhaps the world. Top, forward thinking producers have pushed huge changes in the winemaking culture of the area, and as a result finer, purer Barolo is being produced than ever before.

Grape Type: Nebbiolo

Arguably Italy's greatest red grape variety, responsible in North-West Italy’s Piedmont region for the great reds of Barolo, Barbaresco and Roero. At its best it produces wines of an aromatic complexity and subtlety similar to that of great Burgundy, a region from where many pioneering producers such as Elio Altare drew their inspiration. The aromas and flavours are very different in profile to Pinot Noir however, usually characterised by roses, tar and truffle. Naturally tannic and acidic, Nebbiolo wines are excellent for long term ageing.