Langhe Nebbiolo, Prinsiot, 2015

  Fratelli Alessandria

Contains Sulphites.

About Fratelli Alessandria

An historic Verduno estate that dates back as far as the 8th century. A true family affair Vittore Alessandria, his mother Flavia, father Gian Battista & uncle Ale have been working hard in recent years to give more precision to their charming wines: more leaves, fewer treatments in the vineyards, along with the investment into a battery of Swiss coopered Slavonian oak botti have all helped to give increased focus to the wines. Made in a traditional and non-interventionist way, the wines are fermented gently and slowly before elevage in large oak cask for three years. These are some of the aromatic, elegant and charming Barolos you’ll find.

Appellation: Piedmont

Piedmont sitting at the foot of the mountains is justly regarded as one of, if not the finest wine growing region in Italy. The noblest grape found in the region in undoubtedly Nebbiolo, with the DOCG's of Barolo and Barbaresco at the forefront of production. Barbera and Dolcetto come in second and third, and being earlier ripening are often found located on those sides of the hills that receive less sunshine. The wines from Piedmont are intrinsically food friendly wines, a fact understandable given the culinary strength of the area.

Grape Type: Nebbiolo

Arguably Italy's greatest red grape variety, responsible in North-West Italy’s Piedmont region for the great reds of Barolo, Barbaresco and Roero. At its best it produces wines of an aromatic complexity and subtlety similar to that of great Burgundy, a region from where many pioneering producers such as Elio Altare drew their inspiration. The aromas and flavours are very different in profile to Pinot Noir however, usually characterised by roses, tar and truffle. Naturally tannic and acidic, Nebbiolo wines are excellent for long term ageing.