Justerini & Brooks, Dry Riesling, 2015

  Justerini & Brooks

The Justerini & Brooks Dry Riesling is made exclusively for us by August Kesseler, one of Germany's greatest producers of Trocken (dry) white wines, and Pinot Noir. It comes from the first passage through the vines of a very steep southwest facing, slate vineyard called Lorcher Schlossberg in the Western Rheingau. For those that know the area is is very close to the Rudesheimer Berg. August is all about purity, delicacy and freshness over power so in that respect his style veers more towards the Mosel than many other Rheingau producers. Falling well within the technically "dry" classification for Germany this is all about crisp, refreshing intense crisp apple flavours and fine slate minerality. Pure Summer in a glass.

Contains Sulphites.

About Justerini & Brooks

The design and selection of our House range is quite literally, an ongoing project. Tastings are numerous and rigorous; our aim is to find wines that we believe are both representative of their origins and that have an extra quality over and above our competitors' equivalents. Wines that do not continue to produce the quality we expect we de-list. Our current house list represents a selection of old favourites, 61 Reserve Claret, Pomerol, Sarcey and 250th Cuvee Champagnes and Directors Tawny. Alongside these is our newest label, our House Red Burgundy which has been praised time and again by clients and press alike. It is a real filip to our range and now comes from one of the great names in the Côte-de-Nuits. With grapes from in-and-around the villages of Vosne and Nuits it is utterly pure and refined red burgundy at a price that simply cannot be beaten.

Appellation: Rheingau

7,700 acres along the northern side of the Rhine between Wiesbaden and Rüdesheim where the Riesling produces classic and substantial wines.

Grape Type: Riesling

One of the world’s noblest grape varieties, Riesling produces scented, refreshing, mineral wines from dry to lusciously sweet. Its bad reputation, tarnished by the cloying and completely unrelated Liebfraumilch, is one of the wine world’s great injustices. Its heartland is the steep Mosel and Rheingau valleys of Germany, where it produces floral spritzy off-dry to medium wines packed with lime and apple fruit or, when affected by botrytis, honeyed apricot characteristics. In Alsace, Austria’s Wachau and Germany’s Franken there are some exhilarating, complex dry versions that work very well with Oriental fusion foods, as well as some stunning sweet versions. Some superb lively fruit-forward styles are cropping up in New Zealand, Constantia in South Africa and the cooler parts of Australia and California.