Sancerre , 2017

  Lucien Crochet

£76.50 for 12x37.5cl
10 cs, 10 btls
 
£130.00 for 12x75cl
10 cs, 8 btls
 

Contains Sulphites.

About Lucien Crochet

Bon Viveur Gilles Crochet, son of Lucien, looks after winemaking duties at this Estate. The winery is ultra modern, fitted out with the very latest temperature controlled fermentation vessels. The emphasis is on creating wines of fi nesse and complexity that are faithful to terroir and vintage. The vineyards are located around the towns of Bué, Sancerre and Crézancy, the finest of which is the south-facing limestone-based Chêne Marchand vineyard. Gilles makes his wines as naturally as possible using indigenous yeasts and through hand picking, careful selection of the grapes and long, slow ageing sur lie produces taut, sophisticated and age-worthy Sancerre.

Appellation: Sancerre

On the opposite banks of the Loire from Pouilly sits Sancerre. Whilst much of what is grown in Sancerre can be of variable quality, there are enough good growers to ensure it is also home to some of the greatest of France's Sauvignon Blancs. Cotat, Crochet, Pinard all domonstrate this, with the last two also producing some particularly fine and haunting red sancerre from Pinot Noir.

Grape Type: Sauvignon Blanc

There are various styles of Sauvignon Blanc from the fragrant, fresh Loire Valley style reminiscent of cut-grass, gooseberry, flint and nettles, to the contrasting Bordeaux-style, often blended with Semillon and Muscadelle and barrel-fermented to produce the richer, if less assertive, food friendly dry whites of Pessac-Leognan in the Graves. At the same time, it is also a vital component in the sweet, rich and luscious whites of Sauternes and Barsac. As a dry wine it has sprung to particular fame in New Zealand where it is made in a very pungent, expressive style with notes of kiwi passion fruit and mango. While South Africa has also had great success with the variety. Generally considered for youthful consumption, age-worthy examples can be found in Bordeaux, and the Loire from the likes of Didier Dagueneau and François Cotat.