New Zealand

Appellations

A large and extremely diverse region, Auckland is home to some of New Zealand’s largest wholesale wine manufacturers, as well as a many high-end wineries. The local sub-regions are united by volcanic, clay-rich soils and a temperate maritime climate.
The most southerly wine growing region in the world, and home to some of New Zealands most exciting and dynamic wine producers. Pinot Noir thrives on the continental climate, where strong day night temperature swings produce wines of huge allure and fruit. Pinot gris, Chardonnay and Riesling make up the rest of the plantings.
Hawke’s Bay is a region on the east coast of New Zealand’s North Island. In addition to it's wineries it's known for its beaches and eye-catching art deco architecture. It is New Zealand's second-largest wine producing appellation (after Marlborough) and is particularly lauded for its Bordeaux Blends.
Marlborough sits at the tip of the South Island is the largest of New Zealands big three wine regions. Situated in a large flat valley floor with deep gravel and silt beds, summers are dry and nights often cool. Sauvignon Blanc is the grape the region is most famous for, though much of what is produced here is sold off in bulk to large commercial producers.
At the southern tip of the North Island sits Martinborough, an area of great terroir diversity. Numerous small scale producers go to great lengths in the pursuit of quality investing much of their effort in vineyard management and achieving low yields. Palliser and Dry River demonstrate just how good the wines from the region can be.
The vineyards of New Zealand lie in between the 35º and 45º latitudes, the European equivalent of between Bordeaux and Southern Spain.

However the cold, strong prevailing westerly winds from the Pacific make for a cooler overall climate than the figures suggest. Growing vines on the margins can have some spectacular results, notably Rieslings in the Mosel and Chardonnay in Chablis. Nevertheless, it was not until the 1980s that large-scale plantings of quality varieties got underway. The whole nation's cultural attitudes changed - Müller-Thurgau was replaced by Sauvignon and was planted on the dry gravely riverbeds of Martinborough and Marlborough.

Throughout the 1990s, Pinot Noir vineyards sprouted in all parts of both the North and South islands, from Auckland to Central Otago. At Justerini & Brooks we have followed developments carefully. We have worked with New Zealand's most respected and sought-after wineries for more than a dozen years. The highly successful Palliser Estate, is now considered the benchmark for Pinot Noir at both Pencarrow and Palliser levels, it is also producing fabulous Sauvignon that has an extra ripeness and texture in comparison to the grassier examples found in Marlborough. The Estate's long-term viticulturist and winemaker, Allan Johnson, has a great advantage in having this dual role, as he has complete control of the winemaking process from start to finish. He spends twice as much money on viticulture than most of his neighbours and the results speak for themselves.