Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, 2014

  Saxton Bridge

Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough

Contains Sulphites.

Appellation: Marlborough

Marlborough sits at the tip of the South Island is the largest of New Zealands big three wine regions. Situated in a large flat valley floor with deep gravel and silt beds, summers are dry and nights often cool. Sauvignon Blanc is the grape the region is most famous for, though much of what is produced here is sold off in bulk to large commercial producers.

Grape Type: Sauvignon Blanc

There are various styles of Sauvignon Blanc from the fragrant, fresh Loire Valley style reminiscent of cut-grass, gooseberry, flint and nettles, to the contrasting Bordeaux-style, often blended with Semillon and Muscadelle and barrel-fermented to produce the richer, if less assertive, food friendly dry whites of Pessac-Leognan in the Graves. At the same time, it is also a vital component in the sweet, rich and luscious whites of Sauternes and Barsac. As a dry wine it has sprung to particular fame in New Zealand where it is made in a very pungent, expressive style with notes of kiwi passion fruit and mango. While South Africa has also had great success with the variety. Generally considered for youthful consumption, age-worthy examples can be found in Bordeaux, and the Loire from the likes of Didier Dagueneau and François Cotat.