Pinot Noir, Vrede, Hemel en Aarde, 2016

  Storm Wines

£135.00 for 6x75cl
1 cs
 
£148.39 for 6x75cl
5 btls
 

Stepping up a gear with the Pinots, the Vrede exudes confident, dark Pinot fruit, sensual plum, wild raspberry and plush, very elegant tannins. Excellent length and potential for ageing. From a cool, eastern slope in the Hemel-en-Aarde Ridge on low-vigour, stony clay-rich soils with a cool Atlantic influence. Aged for 11 months in 25% new Burgundy barrique.

Contains Sulphites.

About Storm Wines

Storm Vineyards are a relatively recent addition to the South African fine wine scene, releasing their first commercial vintage in 2012. An ex-Hamilton Russell winemaker, Hannes Storm crafts beautiful Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, and is fortunate enough to own vineyards in the Hemel-en-Aarde Valley, Ridge and Upper Valley, making him the only producer to harvest Pinots from each of the three appellations. We love the Storm Pinots for their detailed flavour profiles, classy textures, restraint and purity of fruit. Production is tiny and we are delighted to have an allocation of the new vintages.

Appellation: Hemel-en-Aarde

Hemel-en-Aarde, or “Heaven and Earth” as it means in English, is a cool climate South African wine region within the wider Walker Bay and in close proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. A distinctly maritime profile and frequent cooling breezes has encouraged plantings of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, where it generally excels. The region is further split in to three sub-appellations: Valley, Upper Valley and Ridge, each with its own distinct character, according to soil type, topography and climate. They were created as recently as 2009 and time will tell as to how these variations manifest themselves in the final wines. The most famous inhabitants of the Hemel-en-Aarde are Hamilton Russell, Newton Johnson and Bouchard Finlayson, as well as a number of increasingly important producers such as Restless River, Storm Wines and Tesserlaarsdall.

Grape Type: Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the classic grape of red burgundy, whose greatest wines are concentrated in the east and south-east-facing clay/limestone hills of Burgundy's Côte d'Or. A notoriously temperamental variety, Pinot Noir has proved difficult to grow in certain climates and soils and will not tolerate over-cropping. The best examples have wonderfully expressive aromas and thrillingly pure bitter sweet red forest fruit and cherry flavours, developing truffle and game overtones with age. Outside of Burgundy, Pinot Noir has had great success in New Zealand, California’s Carneros, Oregon and the more marginal, cooler districts in Australia. Along with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir is also one of the major components of Champagne.