Château Angélus, 1er Grand Cru Classé, St Emilion, 2015

  Château Angélus

Hubert de Bouard's flagship estate is back to its very best. Some would question Angelus' promotion to Premier Grand Cru Classé 'A' status, and we are not going to enter the debate, St Emilion politics is a can of worms best left unopened… What we can say is that the 2015 Angelus is very impressive and very technical. Produced from 62% Merlot and 38% Cabernet Franc, it is brooding initially, then develops notes of toast, smoke, cassis, black cherry, violets and gravel. The palate is impressively concentrated with dark mulberry liqueur flavours and Valrhona notes. There is clearly a lot of extract, it is almost thick, but we think the winemaking team deserve a lot of credit; they have resisted the temptation to go too far and the wine retains good energy and acidity and impressive fruit coated tannins. An impressive, growling, yet harmonious Angelus.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Angélus

Château Angélus, on its renowned south facing "pied de côte" (foot of the hill) site, has been looked after over four generations by the Boüard de Laforest family. The estate’s name derives from a particularly ancient plot of vineyard, from which the men tending the vines were able to hear the angelus ringing out from all three of the village churches, chapelle de Mazerat the church of Saint Martin de Mazerat and the church of Saint Emilion. At the turn of the century Maurice de Boüard de Laforest acquired this three hectare plot, adding it to the adjacent vineyard - Château Mazerat - which had been in the family since 1850. His sons Jacques and Christian expanded the holding by buying adjoining plots of land, until stopping in the 1970s. Today the property is run by Hubert de Boüard de Laforest and his cousin Jean-Bernard Grenié. Angelus, a 1er Grand Cru St Emilion, is now one of the region’s great names, known particular for producing wines with a high Cabernet Franc content.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.