Château Belair Monange, 1er Grand Cru Classé, St Emilion, 2010

  Château Belair Monange

Formally one of the many Belairs, this wonderful but underachieving estate was taken over by Christian Moueix in time for the 2008 vintage. Planted with exceptionally old vines, Belair Monange occupies one of the best sites on the Cote next to Ausone. Beautiful high toned bouquet of cut flowers, chalk, smoke, plums, mocha, minerals and griotte cherries. The palate is suave, opulent, polished with great length of fruit and good mid palate weight. This is a regal St Emilion that demonstrates just how good this terroir is.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Belair Monange

The estate formally known as Chateau Belair - one of the most revered estates in Bordeaux; Belair Monange is the renaissance of a great terroir. Despite its enviable position on the limestone Cote of St Emilion, next to Chateau Ausone, Belair was a perennial underachiever, unable to replicate past glories from its heyday.

Purchased in 2007 by the Moueix family, the name was changed in honour of Anne-Adèle Monange, wife of Jean Moueix, and also to avoid confusion with the multitude of other Belairs! A huge effort in the vineyard, in the winery and also restoring the Chateau has made an instant impact. The first vintage produced under the watchful eye of Christian and Edouard Moueix was the 2008. The results were clear to see. In September 2012 Belair Monange incorporated the neighbouring vineyards of Magdelaine (also a Moueix estate). This has increased production and far from diluting the quality, subsequent vintages keep getting better and better. Those who like serious, ethereal, high-toned St Emilion should take note.

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.