Château Gloria, Cru Bourgeois, St Julien, 2014

  Château Gloria

This is St Pierre's little brother, and while it too leans towards a gutsy style, it more often than big brother gets it spot on. This is by no means the most vivid or exiting Gloria we have tasted, in fact, at times it appears a bit forced, however, there is lots of positive extract, notes of dark berry fruit, Christmas cake, dried fruits and minerals. What impresses is that the fruit remains clear and present on the finish and is not overawed by the tannic structure of the wine. This should be good value for those who like the big, robust style from this Chateau. * It is worth noting that we tasted at the St Julien UGC at the end of a very long day. We felt that the samples were not necessarily representative. Our notes are an honest account of what we tasted, however, we are sure that the wines are much better than our notes suggest.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château Gloria

In 1942 Henri Martin purchased four hectares of vines in St Julien, which became Gloria. Over the years, Henri has bought parcels from St Pierre (also one of his estates), and super seconds: Ducru Beaucaillou, Gruaud Larose, Leoville Poyferre and Leoville Barton. Now at 48 hectares, the estate produces 20,000 cases of its first wine each year and is carving a reputation as one of the region’s best value wines. As its inception was some time after the 1855 classification, this is simply an AOC St Julien, but it gives many a cru classé a run for their money.

Appellation: St Julien

St-Julien may not have any first growths like its neighbour Pauillac but has a raft of high-performing Châteaux in its ranks, second through to fourth growths, Including Ducru-Beaucaillou, Léoville Las Cases, Léoville-Poyferré, Léoville-Barton.
Gruaud-Larose and Talbot. For many St-Julien is quintessential claret, robust, powerful but refined subtle and poised. Gravelly soils dominate, hence wide plantings of Cabernet Sauvignon with some Merlot.