Château L'Eglise Clinet, Pomerol, 2011

  Château L'Eglise Clinet

Denis Durantou explained that 'the wines of the 2011 vintage harvested from those parcels which did not suffer from the heat wave of Sunday the 26th and Monday the 27th of June, and which were spared from hailstorms... bring together in harmony all the tastes of a wine: floral and ripe fruit aromas, a firm and dense texture and then voluptuous depth'. Denis' flagship, Eglise Clinet does all of the above. This 90% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc cuvee is again one of the stars of the plateau. There is a hauntingly beautiful bouquet that is both full of primary soft fruit and deeply reserved with notes of flowers and complex minerals woven into the aromatic profile. As one would expect from Eglise Clinet, the palate is packed with sumptuous fruit, sweet cherries, and notes of dark chocolate; there is a wonderful intensity here and a paradox of enormous power, yet an overwhelming sensation of elegance, charm and refinement. The alcohol levels in 2011 are lower than 2009 and 2010, which many traditionalists will applaud. Denis should be well pleased with his range of 2011s and this, the crowning achievement is just about the most sumptuous, generous, cashmere lined example we found on the right bank. An epic wine, which will be fascinating to taste next to the 2009 and 2010 in years to come.

Contains Sulphites.

About Château L'Eglise Clinet

Since 1983, Denis Durantou has been at the helm of this historic estate. He has quietly performed something of a revolution, introducing a host of innovations and bringing his wine-making philosophy to one of the greatest terroirs in Bordeaux. The 4.5 hectares used for the grand vin are situated next to the church in Pomerol on gravel and clay soils. A further 1.5 hectares of on sandy soils account for the excellent Petite Eglise.

Denis’ wines receive many accolades, all richly deserved. The grand vin is consistently amongst the best wines of the vintage; they are typically perfumed, nuanced and posses the structure to age gracefully for many decades.

Appellation: Pomerol

Pomerol’s Merlot-dominated wines at their best are rich, seductive and silky. For hundreds of years Pomerol was considered as nothing but a satellite district of neighbouring St-Émilion to the east, and it was not really until not until the 1950s that Pomerol started its meteoric rise led by Château Petrus. By far the most dominant merchants in the region are Jean-Pierre Moueix who own or distribute the majority of the finest properties in Pomerol, the most renowned being Petrus.

Pomerol's finest wines originate from the highest parts of the plateau, which is predominantly gravel and clay, with an iron rich subsoil called crasse de fer.
Apparently as important in fashioning wines that are plump, voluptuous, and richly Merlot dominates plantings dramatically, though the notable exception is Vieux Château Certan, nearly half of their estate is devoted Cabernet Franc. Pomerol has no no official classification, but its small scale wines fetch some of the greatest prices for wine in the world. The regions greatest names are Pétrus, Lafleur, Certan de May, Hosanna, La Fleur de Gay, L'Église-Clinet, Le Pin, La Conseillante, Trotanoy, , L'Évangile, Latour-à-Pomerol, and Vieux-Ch-Certan