Le Dragon de Quintus, St Emilion, Grand Cru, 2015

  Chateau Quintus

Le Dragon de Quintus, St Emilion, Grand Cru

Contains Sulphites.

About Chateau Quintus

Quintus is Prince Robert of Luxembourg's new project in St Emilion. 'The estate naturally wraps around a high promontory which represents the end of the plateau of Saint-Émilion. The vineyard benefits from a majestic panorama extending towards the neighbouring village and across the entire Dordogne valley. It is in this place that, for time immemorial, a watch tower has stood to ensure the defence of the village of Saint-Emilion.

The originality of this extraordinary terroir lies in its diversity of soils, slopes and orientations. It is therefore hardly surprising that this wine was featured between 1844 and 1848 among the 14 most sought after and most expensive wines of Saint-Émilion. For close to a century the great reference book Cocks and Feret “Bordeaux et ses Vins” will consistently mention the property as a First Growth of Saint-Emilion. The vineyard was also one of the prominent Saint-Emilion estates to receive a gold medal at the Exposition Universelle de Paris in 1867.

A text found in another great book of the time “Les Grands Vins de Gironde” de Dumas et Lallemand (1899) reads: “One cannot imagine a more beautiful situation for an estate, or one more favourable for the production of a First Growth wine (…). Thanks to the excellent vinification practices undertaken at this estate, the wine produced here reflects great body, ripeness and an armature that exemplify the great wines of Saint-Emilion.”'

Appellation: St Emilion

St-Émilion is a very different region to those of the Médoc, dominated by small-holding farmers and estates rather than grand Châteaux. Merlot is widely planted as is Cabernet Franc in some parts. The wines are enormously variable in style depending on the terroir, the grape variety make-up and winemaking style. Loosely the region is divided between the limestone Côtes, Graves or gravelly limestone plateau or the sandy alluvial soils nearer the Dordogne. Traditionally Médoc wines were trade from Bordeaux and St Emilions from Libourne so they have their own classification system separate to that of 1855. The classification is revised every ten years and falls into four categories, St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé
Most of the district's best properties are either on the steep, clay-limestone hillsides immediately below the town or on a gravelly section of the plateau west of St Emilion itself abutting Pomerol. There are several high profile estates in the region, including Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Figeac, Le Dôme, Valandraud and Pavie.