Clos L'Eglise, Pomerol, 2009

  Clos l'Eglise

`After the brilliant 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2005, I didn’t think proprietor Helene Garcin and consulting winemaker Dr. Alain Raynaud could do any better, but the 2009 Clos l’Eglise may turn out to be superior to the aforementioned vintages. An extraordinary wine of compelling intensity, opulence, and breadth of flavor, it possesses a dark purple color as well as copious aromas of sweet mocha, coffee-infused blackberry and black cherry fruit, and no hint of oak. Fleshy and extravagantly rich with terrific purity and precision, it is a very full-bodied, powerful Pomerol that should drink well for 25+ years. 96-100*/100`. – Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate #188
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"The 2009 is one of the sexiest wines in Pomerol in this vintage, offering up notes of melted caramel, sweet mocha, blackberry and black cherry fruit, with hints of loamy soil and unsmoked cigar tobacco as well as a touch of white chocolate and some subtle toasty oak. Round, opulent and unctuously textured, with a full-bodied mouthfeel, fabulous purity, and no hard edges, this sumptuous, fleshy, lavishly rich Pomerol can be drunk now and over the next 25 years.

Starting with the resurrection of this property in 1998, I have long been a huge fan of Helene Garcin’s older vintages of Clos l’Eglise, so I am hard-pressed to say that the 2009 Clos l’Eglise (virtually all Merlot, with some Cabernet Franc) could be any better than her brilliant efforts in such vintages as 2000, 2001 and 2005." 98/100 Robert Parker, Wine Advocate #199

Contains Sulphites.

About Clos l'Eglise

There are just 6 hectares of vines at Clos L’Eglise planted with 60% Merlot and 40% Cabernet Franc on clay and gravel soils. Helene Garcin-Leveque has invested heavily in this estate. With such exceptional terroir it is probably only a matter of time before this 1250 case cuvee becomes one of the superstars of the commune.

Appellation: Pomerol

Pomerol’s Merlot-dominated wines at their best are rich, seductive and silky. For hundreds of years Pomerol was considered as nothing but a satellite district of neighbouring St-Émilion to the east, and it was not really until not until the 1950s that Pomerol started its meteoric rise led by Château Petrus. By far the most dominant merchants in the region are Jean-Pierre Moueix who own or distribute the majority of the finest properties in Pomerol, the most renowned being Petrus.

Pomerol's finest wines originate from the highest parts of the plateau, which is predominantly gravel and clay, with an iron rich subsoil called crasse de fer.
Apparently as important in fashioning wines that are plump, voluptuous, and richly Merlot dominates plantings dramatically, though the notable exception is Vieux Château Certan, nearly half of their estate is devoted Cabernet Franc. Pomerol has no no official classification, but its small scale wines fetch some of the greatest prices for wine in the world. The regions greatest names are Pétrus, Lafleur, Certan de May, Hosanna, La Fleur de Gay, L'Église-Clinet, Le Pin, La Conseillante, Trotanoy, , L'Évangile, Latour-à-Pomerol, and Vieux-Ch-Certan