Échezeaux, Grand Cru, 2012

  Faiveley

Échezeaux, Grand Cru

Contains Sulphites.

About Faiveley

Founded in 1825, Domaine Faiveley has seen its fair share of vintages. Based in the Côte de Nuits, this family run domaine has over time, progressed and expanded to such a point that it now owns vines in some of the finest terroirs in Burgundy, including Gevrey-Chambertin, Volnay, and Puligny-Montrachet. The vineyards are small averaging at 1 hectare; therefore production sizes are extremely limited. Yet the domaine commands more than 10 hectares of Grand Crus, including the entirely Faiveley owned Corton Clos des Cortons Faiveley Grand Cru. Maturation takes place in oak barrels from coopers have been rigorously selected for their fine grain and light toast. The wines are distinctly individual, reflecting the terroir from which they came. Remaining a family run domaine, it was François Faiveley who introduced more modern techniques of sorting and fermentation. Now, he has passed this on to his son, Erwan Faiveley, who took over the domaine in 2007. Wine produced under the Joseph Faiveley label are a product of fruit sourced by the negociant arm of the business, in many cases, from some of the top vineyards in Burgundy. The Faiveley family also own Domaine de la Framboisiere in Mercurey from which they had bought fruit from since 1933. After working together for four generations they bought the Domaine in 2011.

Appellation: Echézeaux

Grand cru of the Flagey-Échezeaux village in the Côte de Nuits, producing red wines. Premier Cru vineyards in the commune of Flagey-Échezeaux are sold under the name of neighbour Vosne-Romanée, however the majority of the village's vineyard area is divided between two Grands Crus Échezeaux and Grands Échezeaux. The former is the larger of the two, comprising 37.6 ha accross 11 lieux dits or single named plots, so rather like Clos de Vougeot quality and style can vary according to the producer (of which there are 80) and depending on where the vines are. The soils range from poor and stony to heavy and clay-dominated. The wines can be very good and at their best display true Grands Crus power, stylistically they are often very ripe rich examples of Burgundy that age well. The appellation no doubt owes alot to the late Henri Jayer whose outstanding bottlings showed the heights Échezeaux can reach. The Jayer vines are now mainpulated by Henri's nephew, Emmanuel Rouget.