Vougeot - Les Petits Vougeots - 1er Cru, 2013

  Hudelot Noellat

Vougeot - Les Petits Vougeots - 1er Cru

Contains Sulphites.

About Hudelot Noellat

Domaine Hudelot-Noëllat dates back to 1964, when Odile Noellat and Alain Hudelot married and inherited quite the portfolio of fine Burgundy plots, including a 5 ha parcel of Vosne- Romanée.
Nowadays, the domaine’s portfolio traverses all of Burgundy’s glittering appellations, including Richebourg, Romanée st Vivant, Vosne Romanée les Malconsorts, Les Beaumonts and Les Suchots. The vines are old, dating as far back as 1920. Planted with fine clones across the entire vineyard, winemaking is traditional and selection precise, with fermentation taking place in concrete vats.
Presided over by Alain Hudelot-Noëllat until 2007, when his grandson, Charles van Canneyt took over the domaine. Charles’s philosophy is to create wines that exude charm, a sense of depth, purity and finesse.

Appellation: Bourgogne

Bourgogne or Burgundy is a wide-ranging generic appellation in eastern France that has been planted with the vine at least since Roman times, the earliest archaeological evidence coming from 2nd Century A.D. The region, now spanning up to 28,000 hectares, owes a lot to the work of Cistercian Monks in the 11th and 12th Centuries, particularly in the Côte d'Or, who were responsible for identifying some of the finest vineyard plots still in existence today. The appellation is large, stretching between the cities of Auxerre in the North and Lyon in the south and includes Chablis, the Côte d'Or (from where hail some of the world's finest examples of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir), the Chalonnais, Maconnais and Beaujolais. Chardonnay is the main white grape planted, though there is still a fair amount of Aligote to be found if an ever decreasing amount, as well as tiny proportions of Pinot Blanc and Pinot Beurrot. For quality reds Pinot Noir is the dominant grape and the only permitted variety for the "Bourgogne Rouge" appellation controlee, there are plantings of Gamay too, though, which can be blended with a minimum one third Pinot Noir to make "Bourgogne Passetoutgrain." There is also the rarely seen Bourgogne Grand Ordinaire, which may include the Pinot Noir, Gamay, César, and Tressot varieties. This appellation also exists for whites, allowing a blend of Chardonnay, Aligoté and Melon de Bourgogne. Being such a big area style can vary enormously: From the steely, minerally white Bourgognes near Chablis to the rounder, more buttery offerings in the Maconnais. Very fine and extremely good value examples of red and white Bourgognes are made by many of the high quality estates in the Côte d'Or, the designated "Bourgogne" vineyards here being on the flatter less well-drained terrain the other side of the RN74 road to the villages and 1er Cru appellations. Some Bourgogne Rosé can also made be made but this is a tiny fraction of the red and white wine production.