Chassagne Montrachet, Morgeot, 1er Cru, 2010

  Jean Noel Gagnard

Open-knit, aromatic, opulent and very expressive; fleshy fruit notes of yellow plum, nectarine and greengage but not without balance or lift, these full flavours being offset by a racy lime rind quality. Richer notes of acacia and nut are evident on the mid-palate, whilst on the finish the wine tightens a little and finds its focus with strong, vibrant mineral and earth notes coming through. Fully, deeply complex Chassagne. Morgeot is a big vineyard that has the propensity to make very full and sometimes heavy wines, but Caroline’s parcel is from the higher part of the Morgeot where the wines show more finesse and distinction.

Contains Sulphites.

About Jean Noel Gagnard

Jean-Noël has now long since retired, his daughter, Caroline Lestimé, has taken control of the vineyard, cellar and office at Domaine Jean-Noël Gagnard since the mid nineties and has recently been joined in this by her husband Hubert. Caroline is producing authentic Chassagne of great quality in way that is respectful both to tradition and the environment. The Domaine’s boundaries encompass some superb vineyards including Chassagne-Montrachet Les Caillerets and Bâtard-Montrachet. The white wines are made in the traditional way, being kept in barrel for at least 18-20 months, only about a quarter of which will be new, and are bottled with only the very lightest of filtrations. They are expressive, impressive Chassagnes that display the complex nuances of their terroir. The estate was certified organic as of the 2014 vintage.

Appellation: Chassagne-Montrachet

A village and appellation at the southern end of the Côte de Beaune covering over 300 hectares, that is now widely acclaimed for its white wines, though was once very much a red wine village. Plantings of Pinot Noir are still relatively high when compared to Puligny or Meursault, however it is the white wines that enjoy international acclaim. Within the commune sit part of Le Montrachet and Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru vineyards as well as Criots-Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru in its entirety. There are a total of 51 Premier Crus vineyards, though many of these are part other larger, better known vineyards and carry that name on the label, Morgeot being a good example of this. The wines are plump and racy, less elegant and refined than Puligny, full bodied but less fat and more vitality than a Meursault.