Beaune, Rouge, 2011

  Pierre Boisson

Contains Sulphites.

About Pierre Boisson

This is one of those rare finds, never before available in the UK until 2011, Boisson Vadot have long been content to sell to a mailing list of private customers in France believing that they should let “people come to them” rather than chasing export business around the world. We think this has the potential to be one of the great domains in Burgundy. The Boisson family Domaine in Meursault is a total of 8.5 hectares. These are divided up between Bernard Boisson and his two children, Pierre and Anne. Although the wines are labelled individually as Boisson-Vadot, Pierre Boisson and Anne Boisson, they make the wines altogether in excactly the same way. The parcels of vines are primarily situated in Meursault with smaller holdings in Auxey-Duresses, Monthelie, Pommard and Beaune. Although not certified organic the Domaine never use any fertiliser or pesticides and all the vines are ploughed to control weeds and to air the soil. Vinification is traditional and the harvest is done by hand. The grapes are sorted in the vines and back at the Domaine before going into vats. The wine is aged in oak barrels between 15 and 18 months, sometimes more if the vintage demands it. New oak is used very sparingly, though there are no hard & fast rules as to percentages of new or old barrels, the vintage decides. What is clear, t though, is that in no way do the Domaine want the oak to mask the character of the wine. Bottling is done at the Domaine without any filtration. The wines, even at Bourgogne level, are incredibly intense, taut and powerful, they are definitely the more mineral side of the Meursault spectrum. The flinty, powerful Meursaults rank among the very top wines of the commune.

Appellation: Beaune

The commercial hub of Burgundian wine giving its name to the Côte de Beaune section of the Côte d’Or, Beaune was originally founded as a Roman camp by Julius Caesar, later becoming the seat of the Dukes of Burgundy in the fourteenth century. It is the Côte d’Or's third largest commune after Gevrey-Chambertin and Meursault. Its band of premiers crus, of which there are 44, stretches from Pommard in the south to the boundary with Savigny in the north. The soils are complex and varied and therefore so are the resulting styles of wine, however it is true to say that in general its Pinot Noir vineyards are usually some of the first to ripen in the Côte de Beaune, at least outside of the vinyeards on the Corton hill, and produce rich, ripe sturdy wines that may lack the finesse of the Volnays or Chambolle's of this world but compensate for this by showing a great deal of guts and character.