Meursault Village, 2013

  Pierre Boisson

Contains Sulphites.

About Pierre Boisson

This is one of those rare finds, never before available in the UK until 2011, Boisson Vadot have long been content to sell to a mailing list of private customers in France believing that they should let “people come to them” rather than chasing export business around the world. We think this has the potential to be one of the great domains in Burgundy. The Boisson family Domaine in Meursault is a total of 8.5 hectares. These are divided up between Bernard Boisson and his two children, Pierre and Anne. Although the wines are labelled individually as Boisson-Vadot, Pierre Boisson and Anne Boisson, they make the wines altogether in excactly the same way. The parcels of vines are primarily situated in Meursault with smaller holdings in Auxey-Duresses, Monthelie, Pommard and Beaune. Although not certified organic the Domaine never use any fertiliser or pesticides and all the vines are ploughed to control weeds and to air the soil. Vinification is traditional and the harvest is done by hand. The grapes are sorted in the vines and back at the Domaine before going into vats. The wine is aged in oak barrels between 15 and 18 months, sometimes more if the vintage demands it. New oak is used very sparingly, though there are no hard & fast rules as to percentages of new or old barrels, the vintage decides. What is clear, t though, is that in no way do the Domaine want the oak to mask the character of the wine. Bottling is done at the Domaine without any filtration. The wines, even at Bourgogne level, are incredibly intense, taut and powerful, they are definitely the more mineral side of the Meursault spectrum. The flinty, powerful Meursaults rank among the very top wines of the commune.

Appellation: Meursault

Meursault is the largest commune in the Côte de Beaune (spanning over 370ha) producing predominantly white wines. There are no Grand Cru vineyards, but its Premier Crus can equal the best white wines in the Côte de Beaune. The finest vineyards are Les Perrières, Les Genevrières, and Les Charmes. In addition Meursault has a plethora of other named vineyards that aren't Premier Cru but nonetheless show their own distinct characteristics and can offer excellent value, some of the best are Chevalières, Tessons, Clos de la Barre, Luchets, Narvaux, and Tillets. These are lower-lying than the Premiers Crus but are much more interesting than the villages wines of Puligny where the water table is higher. The low water-table is also the reason why some of the region's deepest cellars can be found in Meursault. The commune is big so the style and quality are varied. Generally speaking Meursault is known for its full body and, nutty, buttery character. The best examples have enough vitality and acidity to balance out the 'fat.'