Caol Ila, 35 Year Old, 2018 Release, NV

  Caol Ila

£562.50 for 1x70cl
3 btls
 
Caol Ila, 35 Year Old, 2018 Release

The first-ever Caol Ila 35 year old in this series is also the
oldest Caol Ila Special Release to date, combining whisky from
refill American oak hogsheads and refill American and
European oak butts in a well-balanced and mature expression
that shows a fine freshness, cleanliness and precision for its
age. Just 3,276 bottles.

Antique gold colour, floral and fruity on a fresh-clean, smoky base.
Cooling and fluid, with a smooth texture. Starts sweetly and soon
dries, with a rising peaty pungency and a spicy-sweet finish.

Contains Sulphites.

About Caol Ila

Caol Ila is pronounced “Cull Eela”. It’s the Gaelic name for the Sound of Islay, which separates the island from Jura. For some, the distillery’s pronunciation is as remote as its location, sitting as it does on the rugged eastern coast, where it has remained hidden from view since 1846. However you say it, the fine, smoky whisky produced by generations of islanders is worth exploring. For more than 100 years small coal-fired “puffers” like the SS Pibroch brought barley, coal and empty casks to the distillery, returning her whisky to the mainland through the Sound of Islay. Today, Caol Ila’s secret bay is only known to true Islay devotees. The barley used here is still malted locally at Port Ellen and pure spring water still rises from limestone in nearby Loch nam Ban, then falls to the sea at Caol Ila in a clear crystal stream, just as it always has. Like sea air and peat fires, the distinctive Islay smokiness makes Caol Ila whisky a reference point for connoisseurs of Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky the world over. It’s dry, sea air aromas and pleasing smoky-smoothness evokes a certain sense of place for the drinker – whether you’ve visited this magical island or not.

Appellation: Islay

Islay, the southernmost of the Scottish islands, is almost always recognised by its peaty expression. Islay is covered in peat bogs and in traditional times burning peat was the most effective way of heating and drying the barley used in whisky production. As peat burns it releases pungent peaty smoke which in turn infused the drying barley and influences style.

Among its famous active distilleries, Islay boasts one of the most legendary of ‘lost’ producers: Port Ellen which closed doors in 1983. Beyond the obvious lurks a surprising diversity of spirit, making the identity of Islay whisky a more elusive prospect than might first appear.

Islay is also one of the fastest growing whisky regions in Scotland with several new distilleries having come online in recent years.