Dalwhinnie, 25 Year Old, Highland, NV

  Dalwhinnie

£270.83 for 1x70cl
9 btls
 
Dalwhinnie, 25 Year Old, Highland

A creamy, aromatic and crisply focused mature Dalwhinnie that drinks very well, both straight and with a little water: well-shaped, smoothly fragrant and with intriguing notes of hay and moorland; really clean and fresh for its age, it’s drier and less honeyed than you may expect.

Appearance: Full, yellow gold.
Nose: Extremely fresh throughout. Quite closed, soft and waxy at first, with traces of spirit and citrus; then grassy, with notes of hay soaring above a sweet, malty base. Things open up to reveal fresh high notes of vanilla and floral honey, and below this fruit boxes that once held crisp green apples, unripe pears or gooseberries on a light base of heathery moorland and peat. Water brings up a fresh fruit salad of pear and banana in honeyed syrup, with just a touch of bitter orange. That moorland aroma is now fragrant beeswax and there’s spicy pepper too.
Body: Medium.
Palate: Smooth, creamy texture. Menthol-cool, lightly sweet and citrusy with a fresh edge; malty too, with an unusual yet pleasingly perfumed mid-palate. Finally, drying at the back. Slightly sweeter and quite spicy with water, showing notes of butterscotch and clove then again increasingly dry and aromatic, with more of that hay.
Finish: Quite short and appetisingly dry. Cooling, minty with fragrant pine resins and some very late smoke, finally becoming leafy. With water, dry, warming and softly pungent: just a hint of eucalyptus now.

Contains Sulphites.

About Dalwhinnie

Made in the highest and coldest working distillery in Scotland, with water from a loch at 2000 feet, Dalwhinnie whisky thrives on extreme conditions – creating a liquid as sweet and accessible as its highland home is remote. When it was purpose-built in 1897, the distillery was first called Strathspey. Perhaps looking to distinguish their already distinctive whisky, the owners soon changed the name to Dalwhinnie when production started in 1898. It means “Plain of Meetings” in Gaelic, a reference to the location at a junction of old drove roads, between two mountain ranges. Though beautiful and ancient, the site is not without its drawbacks: a fire in 1934 caused a four year closure, with rebuilding hampered by bitterly cold winters and twenty foot snow drifts. Like sunlight on mountain heather, no other distillery may use the water from Lochan an Doire Uaine – "Loch of the green thicket" – a gathering of pure snowmelt and rainwater high in the Drumochter Hills. That might be why Dalwhinnie Scotch is the only Highland whisky to offer a combination of clean and accessible, malty-sweet taste with a smooth and smoky warmth. It could also be why, Dalwhinnie releases its full honeyed sweetness when served chilled or over ice.

Appellation: Highland

The Highlands are one of Scotland’s vast whisky regions, boasting a spectrum of styles from rich and textured to fragrantly floral, as befits an ever-changing landscape of coastline, moor and mountain.

To call Highland single malts diverse is an understatement: from the fertile east coast to the rugged west, this vast area boasts a rich variety of distillery styles. From light and grassy to heavily sherried – these are whiskies that refuse to be pigeonholed. Some of the most well-known Highland distilleries include Clynelish, Dalmore, Edradour, Glendronach, Oban and Old Pulteney.

Curiously, there are only three distilleries that are allowed to use the ‘Royal Epithet in their names and all are located in the Highlands: Royal Brackla, Glenury Royal (Now closed) and Royal Lochnagar.