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Welcome to the new Justerini & Brooks website

Browse our wine lists, explore our portfolio of growers and delve into the world of whisky right here.

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Our Distilleries

Browse our whisky portfolio

Many collectors’ gems can be found in the Justerini & Brooks portfolio. Below is a cross section of the distilleries we stock, and there are many more we can get a hold of for you.

If something sparks your eye or you would like to learn more about our offering, provenance or broking – please contact a member of our team.

Our Distilleries:

  • A

  • B

  • C

  • D

  • E

  • F

  • G

  • H

  • I

  • J

  • K

  • L

  • M

  • N

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  • Q

  • R

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Auchroisk

Despite being completed as recently as 1974, you can be forgiven for never having heard of the distillery, or having tasted Auchroisk whisky, because much of its distinct character is used to create the signature taste of many blended whiskies. Founded in 1974, Auchroisk is a newbie compared to some of its ancient Speyside counterparts. Though the distillery itself might be a recent addition to the landscape, Auchroisk Single Malt Scotch Whisky is made from the naturally-pure waters of Dorries Well, a feature as old as the hills that gives this whisky its smooth and subtle character. A delightful pre-dinner dram, Auchroisk is light, fresh and citrusy; qualities attributed to the water used in production, drawn from a local spring known as Dorie's Well.

Please note that there is currently no stock available.

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Caol Ila

Caol Ila is pronounced “Cull Eela”. It’s the Gaelic name for the Sound of Islay, which separates the island from Jura. For some, the distillery’s pronunciation is as remote as its location, sitting as it does on the rugged eastern coast, where it has remained hidden from view since 1846. However you say it, the fine, smoky whisky produced by generations of islanders is worth exploring. For more than 100 years small coal-fired “puffers” like the SS Pibroch brought barley, coal and empty casks to the distillery, returning her whisky to the mainland through the Sound of Islay. Today, Caol Ila’s secret bay is only known to true Islay devotees. The barley used here is still malted locally at Port Ellen and pure spring water still rises from limestone in nearby Loch nam Ban, then falls to the sea at Caol Ila in a clear crystal stream, just as it always has. Like sea air and peat fires, the distinctive Islay smokiness makes Caol Ila whisky a reference point for connoisseurs of Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky the world over. It’s dry, sea air aromas and pleasing smoky-smoothness evokes a certain sense of place for the drinker – whether you’ve visited this magical island or not.

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Clynelish

Clynelish is an anglicised version of the Gaelic for green pasture. And, though it’s a coastal whisky, this is fitting for a Scotch with sweet floral fragrances and verdant flavour notes. It’s a name with a long history, one that predates the distillery we know today, but which has adorned the labels of whisky bottles for two hundred years. The distillery we know today is the new Clynelish, and began production in 1969. It’s across the road from the old, original Clynelish, which was built by the Marquess of Stafford in 1819, providing a market for barley grown by his tenants. This closed in 1968 to make room for the larger, more modern neighbour… only to be reborn as Brora – a peated malt – which thrived until the early 80s. Brora, the Marquis and his tenants have all gone, but the barley that makes Clynelish is still malted in the Northern Highlands and water is still piped down from the Clynemilton Burn to the distillery. Full of maritime qualities, you can almost taste the coastal flora in Clynelish Single Malt Scotch Whisky, with its crisp, medium- bodied, mustard-fresh style. Although you won’t find Islay’s powerful smokiness here, there is just a trace of it lingering. It’s said Clynelish whisky is closer to an Island style than other mainland malts, with a complex and fragrant nose and an agreeable long finish that leaves a lingering fresh-fruity flavour. Not a heavyweight, it is yet deliciously drinkable, and perfect as an aperitif.

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Col. Vint.
Wine / Producer Appellation / Region
Format Cs. Btls. Price Tax
Clynelish
  NV
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Format Price Tax
1x70cl 0 11 £585.82 dp Buy
  NV
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Format Price Tax
1x70cl 0 4 £658.12 dp Buy

Cragganmore

Cragganmore distillery takes its rock face of a name from the mountain in whose shadow it sits. And this is a whisky with many high approaches and hidden valleys of flavour. Known as the most complex aroma on Speyside, it must also be one of the most delightful because the distillery can’t keep up with demand. Founded by Speyside legend Big John Smith, Cragganmore was created using a pioneering flat-top pot still design to create the sweetest, most complex of malt whiskies. With layers upon layers, fruity, honeyed notes are often found, and of course the famous fruit cake and toffee flavours. One of the world’s most famous and influential Scotch whisky authors – the late Michael Jackson – also claimed Cragganmore whisky had “the most complex aroma of any malt”. The only way to discover that for yourself is of course to try them all.

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Dailuaine

Dailuaine distillery lies tucked between the foot of Ben Rinnes and the river Spey. The name is taken from the gaelic ‘dail uaine’ meaning green valley, and it’s a title that sits well with the verdant, dew-fresh origins of this naturally fragrant Single Malt Scotch Whisky. Founded in 1853 by farmer William MacKenzie, the distillery has been rebuilt several times, just like its contemporaries along the Spey valley. In 1889, it was the first distillery to be fitted with architect Charles Doig’s pagoda roof. It was also once a main stop on the railway that ran across the region, delivering people, barley and coal to the network of distillers. The building remained as a farm until 1950, when it was rebuilt and electricity finally installed. Sweet, nutty and rich, this is not just an after dinner dram, it’s an after-dinner mood in a liquid. Thick, rich yet pleasantly, palate-cleansingly sweet. Try Dailuaine whisky with the cheese course, or just nose the cheese rind, fruit and citrus aromas hidden in its depths.

Please note that there is currently no stock available.

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Dalwhinnie

Made in the highest and coldest working distillery in Scotland, with water from a loch at 2000 feet, Dalwhinnie whisky thrives on extreme conditions – creating a liquid as sweet and accessible as its highland home is remote. When it was purpose-built in 1897, the distillery was first called Strathspey. Perhaps looking to distinguish their already distinctive whisky, the owners soon changed the name to Dalwhinnie when production started in 1898. It means “Plain of Meetings” in Gaelic, a reference to the location at a junction of old drove roads, between two mountain ranges. Though beautiful and ancient, the site is not without its drawbacks: a fire in 1934 caused a four year closure, with rebuilding hampered by bitterly cold winters and twenty foot snow drifts. Like sunlight on mountain heather, no other distillery may use the water from Lochan an Doire Uaine – "Loch of the green thicket" – a gathering of pure snowmelt and rainwater high in the Drumochter Hills. That might be why Dalwhinnie Scotch is the only Highland whisky to offer a combination of clean and accessible, malty-sweet taste with a smooth and smoky warmth. It could also be why, Dalwhinnie releases its full honeyed sweetness when served chilled or over ice.

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Glenkinchie

Glenkinchie is just fifteen miles from the capital, earning it the title “The Edinburgh Malt”. But it’s strange to think of that dark and distinguished city when you see fields of barley or the green Lammermuir Hills rolling north towards the Firth of Forth. Stranger still when you taste the subtle, floral flavour of this rare Lowland survivor. Founded in 1825 by the farmers John and George Rate, Glenkinchie operated under the name Milton Distillery until it was licenced and renamed in 1837. The new name came from the Kinchie Burn which runs through the glen, which itself derives its name from “de Quincey” who originally owned the land and burn. It was later rebuilt into a redbrick Victorian masterpiece you’ll see today, complete houses for the workers, bowling green, those two fat old copper pot stills and the largest wash still in the industry. A traditional single cast-iron worm tub cools the spirit, in preference to a more modern condenser, giving a whisky of greater character and depth. A light, aromatic apéritif, Glenkinchie whisky is perfect as an apéritif or at the start of a meal due to its fragrant, light body. Distilled in Scotland’s largest stills and matured for at least 12 years, the result is a floral whisky with a fresh, creamy taste.

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Knockando

In each bottle of Knockando whisky you will only ever find the produce of a single season, or year of production – a practice which continues to distinguish this delicate Speyside from almost all other single malts.

Built by John Thompson in 1898, the Knockando distillery sits next to the river Spey in the village of the same name. Derived from the Gaelic ‘Cnoc-an-dhu’ meaning ‘little black hill’, the distillery was founded during the Victorian whisky boom in 1898, but fell foul of dodgy distributors – closing in 1899 after just a year of production. W & A Gilbey soon took over, marking a change of fortunes for the distillery and for lovers of whisky everywhere. Only natural ingredients are used in the production of Knockando: malted barley, yeast and crystal clear spring water from the Cardnach spring, which lies in the hills above the distillery. Together, with time, they create a delicate whisky with a distinctive fresh almond note in its younger versions that gains weight and depth of flavour over the years. No doubt why Knockando whisky reviews are consistently good.

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Lagavulin

The biggest, the most intense, the definitive. The spirit is usually matured for at least 16 years, and we like to think of it as character building. After all, such intense flavour isn't created overnight. From the rugged Hebridean Isles, miles and miles of peat bog in the west of the island provide the raw material which imbues the barley with that distinct smoky flavour. Not to mention the rich peaty water that runs down the brown burn from the Solan Lochs and into the distillery. In case you haven’t figured it out, the smoky, peated Lagavulin is seen as the ultimate expression of this region. There have been distilleries at Lagavulin since the 18th century; though it wasn’t until 1816 that farmer John Johnston founded the first legal operation. A year later a second distillery appeared, this one run by Archibald Campbell. The two were united under a Glasgow trader, and in 1887, Peter Mackie arrived at the distillery, under whose guiding hand the distillery, and the name Lagavulin, was to become the last word in Islay malt. This is an intense, roaring bonfire of a malt. Like a driftwood fire at dusk, their wood-smoke envelopes you, banishing the wet and the cold with maritime notes, salt and an unexpected delicacy reminiscent of lapsang souchong. Not for nothing is this regarded as the definitive Islay, and for many, the definitive Single Malt Scotch Whisky.

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Linkwood

This distillery by the banks of the river Lossie is every bit the idyll of a country distillery, with its woodlands and resident population of Swans. Legend has it that longtime manager Roderick Mackenzie thought the environment so important to the taste of Linkwood, he forbade the removal of spiders’ webs from the rafters in case the character were to change. Great care is still taken to maintain its high standards, though the cobwebs have been removed. Founded in 1821, the distillery sits in a tranquil setting overlooking the dam of the Linkwood Burn. The water that makes Linkwood whisky comes from Millbuies springs, and makes a fine, smooth and complex whisky; just it always has, through wars and depressions, takeovers and closures. Deliciously complex, there’s just a hint of smoke in amongst Linkwood’s verdant garden. It’s this cigar-box tang which signals the complexity and depth held within, and keeps the drinker coming back for more.

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Mannochmore

An integral part of some of the world’s best-loved blends, Mannochmore whisky is perfumed and floral, like a fine white wine. Built next to its older sister distillery Glenlossie, Mannochmore is the only distillery to share a location – and sometimes a workforce – with another distillery. Curiously, despite their close relationship, the two whiskies are completely unique. Mannochmore is a relatively recent addition to the area and the collection. Built on the site of the Glenlossie distillery in 1971, it draws its water from the Bardon Burn – whose ancient beds and banks contributes to the whisky’s direct personality. Another relatively unknown Speyside, Mannochmore often adds its clean, dry and direct flavour to blends, and has come into its own in recent years

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Mortlach

Established in 1823 during an age of great achievement, Mortlach was the first legal distillery in Dufftown, the heart of Speyside. A 190 year secret amongst whisky epicureans across the globe, Mortlach has been nicknamed 'The Beast of Dufftown' by Dave Broom for its robust, muscular and rich character created from the very unique 2.81 distillation process - a magnificent feat unto itself. In its primitive years Mortlach distillery was like all others, that is until George Cowie joined in 1853. Previously an engineer during the Golden Age of Victorian Engineering, George applied his audacity, skill and determination to the distillery, taking it from strength to strength and growing its reputation across the world through a network of private customers.

Mortlach defies the typical honey, vanilla and apples notes of Speyside. Its whisky harks back to a time when Scotch was bigger, bolder, darker. The primal essence of Speyside that once was. A muscular malt, this is a Speyside dram unlike any other: a beast in the sense of power and complexity, with sweetness and dryness held in perfect balance to create an overall long lasting, viscous and complex sipping experience. This muscularity and intensity of flavour is at the heart of each of new expression – created by the distillation process and is the heart and soul of the distillery.

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Col. Vint.
Wine / Producer Appellation / Region
Format Cs. Btls. Price Tax
Mortlach
  NV
Read More
Format Price Tax
1x70cl 0 6 £74.13 dp Buy
  NV
Read More
Format Price Tax
1x70cl 0 6 £192.97 dp Buy
  NV
Read More
Format Price Tax
1x50cl 0 5 £654.91 dp Buy

Oban

For two centuries Oban’s bustling fishing village has set on the frontier of the West Highlands and the Islands, at the meeting place of land and sea. One of Scotland’s oldest licensed distilleries, Oban’s sheltered harbour is perfect for two thing – seafaring and whisky making. Oban is the frontier between the West Highlands and the Islands. Its mild, temperate climate, warmed by the Gulf Stream, sets it apart in a region known for its rugged natural beauty. The proximity to the coast lends Oban some of that salted character for which the Islands are renown, though this is as gentle as the soft rains which give the fishing town its lush surrounds. Founded by Hugh Stevenson, a local merchant and entrepreneur, in 1794, the distillery has formed part of the town’s backbone ever since. Between 1883 and 1887 a man by the name of J. Walter Higgin made vast improvements. This was done bit by bit, in order to keep it in production and so meet the constant demand for Oban Single Malt Scotch Whisky. Today, Oban is made using only the finest barley, malted to the distillery's own particular specification, and finally distilled using those lamp glass-shaped stills. With just a hint of salt spray andbalancing autumn fruits and sea air, Oban whisky owes its rich and rewarding Highland character to its very long fermentation process. The tiny lamp glass-shaped copper pot stills that make Oban’s Scotch are among the smallest in Scotland, and the liquor they distill is slowly condensed in wooden worm tubs outside among the rooftops, exposed to the salted sea air, bringing a distinct depth of flavour said to go very well with salted caramel.

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Talisker

Talisker is the only Single Malt Scotch Whisky made by the sea on the shores of the Isle of Skye, one of the most remote, rugged, yet beautiful landscapes in Scotland. Few whiskies tell the story of their origin better than Talisker. Its smell and taste instantly connect the drinker with the rugged environment – like a warm welcome from a wild sea. It’s a powerhouse; challenging but adored; once discovered rarely left.

In 1825, Hugh MacAskill of Eigg acquired Talisker House and the north end of the Minginish peninsula on the rugged, beautiful Isle of Skye
Five years later, he and his brother had built what was to become one of the world’s most popular distilleries on the shore of Loch Harport. In fact, by as early as 1898, Talisker was one of the best selling malt whiskies in the UK. Through fire, war and financial crises, this northern outpost – Skye’s only distillery – has remained strong: producing consistently fine whiskies which, once tried, are rarely forgotten. Sitting amongst the Inner Hebridean Scottish Isles, Skye is rugged, windswept, a place of extremes. The only whisky on Skye, Talisker captures the spirit of its island home perfectly. Bursting with the famous smokiness, the surprising subtle notes of black pepper, and yet rounded with a smooth finish, Talisker is a delicious contradiction.

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With over 270 years of experience and having brought to market one of the most iconic global whisky brands of the modern era – J&B Rare – Justerini & Brooks is proud to be able to offer access to some of the rarest and most collectible whiskies in the world. Browse our list or alternatively get in touch if you cannot find what you are looking for, our dedicated team of whisky specialists will almost certainly be able to find you that elusive bottle.

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