Julian Campbell
Julian is responsible for The Loire, Southwest France, Alsace, Spain, Germany, USA, Chile, Argentina, Australia and South Africa.

It all started with a bottle of Cheval Blanc 1981. It was to prove an important moment that left an indelible memory, which lead first to exams and then the realisation that he could pursue his fascination with fine wine professionally.

Julian's job at Justerini & Brooks is to understand the people who make these bottles, their vision, and how they unlock the potential in the lands they farm.

This takes him to some of the world’s great vineyards, meeting many of the world’s greatest wine making talents along the way. What makes it so exciting is the almost limitless scope. On every slope there is a new bunch, a new bottle, a new taste.

It is a never-ending journey, always in pursuit of putting a little of that magic he experienced all those years ago into the glasses of Justerini & Brooks’ clients.
Vintage Report: Germany 2018 – Bathed in Sunshine

Vintage Report: Germany 2018 – Bathed in Sunshine

Tuesday 13th August 2019
by Julian Campbell

Germany’s 2018 vintage is one that will go down in the records books for several reasons. It is possibly the biggest, almost certainly the earliest, and very likely one of the driest on record – a vintage that saw almost uninterrupted sunshine from May until harvest started in mid- September.

Most regions had one or two refreshing rain events during the growing season, but otherwise it was sunny, warm, and overall, exceptionally dry. There was no frost, and almost nothing lost to hail – the most notable exceptions being two of Klaus-Peter Keller’s top sites Morstein and Abts E, both of which had their production trimmed by around one third by a severe hail storm on the 1st June.

The Vintage Report: Germany 2017

The Vintage Report: Germany 2017

Tuesday 28th August 2018
by Julian Campbell

Surprisingly good 2017s…a vintage to woo and charm, from intense Grosses Gewachs, to kaleidoscopic TBAs….


2017 was a vintage that threw up its fair share of challenges across Germany’s various winemaking regions– a summer like spring causing a super early start, frost, troubled flowering, hail for the unlucky, and early onset botrytis forcing a highly selective and early harvest.  Despite these conditions the ingenious Riesling grape, particularly in the hands of Germany’s greatest growers, by and large fared amazingly well. There are very many wines here that will not look out of place when viewed next to their sibling vintages of ’16 and ’15 – albeit in a markedly different style. And after all, isn’t that why we buy these wines year in and year out?

A Tasting with Andy Peay of Peay Vineyards

A Tasting with Andy Peay of Peay Vineyards

Friday 6th July 2018
by Julian Campbell

We’ve been championing the wines from the ultra-remote Peay vineyard for a few years now. Planted in 1998, the vineyard turns 20 this year and quality levels have never been higher. 

The lion’s share of production goes to Pinot Noir, followed by Chardonnay and Syrah (alongside minute quantities of other varieties that don’t make it across the pond). The vineyard is nestled amongst huge redwoods, 600 feet above sea level, four miles from the coast and within the inversion layer. Effectively within the fog line, this a truly cool Californian vineyard whose year round temperatures are moderated in a meaningful way by the cold waters of the Pacific Ocean. Contrary to being further in-land, out on the coast the higher you get the warmer it becomes. At 600 feet you hit something of a sweet spot, cool enough to moderate ripening but not so affected by fog as to be constantly battling mildew.  Being 600 feet lower than the lowest vineyards in the nearby Fort Ross and Seaview AVA, (home to the likes of Hirsch, Flowers and Martinelli) means that average yearly temperatures are 12-13 degrees lower at the Peay’s vineyard. That’s a meaningful drop. It is hardly surprising they were repeatedly told that ripening grapes would be a struggle out here and indeed today their tiny yields are testament to this perilous spot. Truly, this is winemaking on the edge.

Champagne Philipponnat: A Clos des Goisses dinner

Champagne Philipponnat: A Clos des Goisses dinner

Friday 27th October 2017
by Julian Campbell

“I have pressed many grapes… but I have NEVER pressed a duck!” 

So went the words of Charles Philipponnat as he was whisked upstairs by Otto, owner and Maitre d’ of his eponymous restaurant on Gray’s Inn Road. “A duck yields a surprising amount of juice!” Charles exclaimed on his return to the table, having been pressed, quite literally into action, helping to operate the silver duck press that Otto uses to serve his legendary Canard a la Presse.

We were in the Private Dining room at Otto’s, a gem of a place, to celebrate 40 years of Clos des Goisses with a group of champagne aficionados. This was the very night after we’d released the epic 2008 on the roof-top of the Ham Yard Hotel, so Clos des Goisses was very much in the air. Other than exploring the famous longevity of Clos des Goisses and its incredible ability to enhance a meal, the rough theme of the evening was ‘8s (for obvious reasons), the oldest wine providing us a rare look at some magical bottles of 1978.

Harvest Report: August Kesseler

Harvest Report: August Kesseler

Friday 22nd September 2017
by Julian Campbell

The team at August Kesseler share their news of the latest vintage direct from the domaine.

“Once again, the time has come! This year our harvest team set off rather early and we have actually already started harvesting the grapes.”  “Over the coming weeks our sole focus will be the grapes and the weather. Will it hold? What vineyard do we harvest first? What grapes will we let hang for a couple more days?  These are the decisions we take on our daily trips through the vineyards from Lorchhausen to Eltville and we are not just thinking of the refractometer (that measures the weight of the must) but also taking a good look at the grapes themselves.  Above all, we give them a try! The most important resources for any winemaker are his taste buds and his experience.”     

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