Julian Campbell
Julian is responsible for The Loire, Southwest France, Alsace, Spain, Germany, USA, Chile, Argentina, Australia and South Africa.

It all started with a bottle of Cheval Blanc 1981. It was to prove an important moment that left an indelible memory, which lead first to exams and then the realisation that he could pursue his fascination with fine wine professionally.

Julian's job at Justerini & Brooks is to understand the people who make these bottles, their vision, and how they unlock the potential in the lands they farm.

This takes him to some of the world’s great vineyards, meeting many of the world’s greatest wine making talents along the way. What makes it so exciting is the almost limitless scope. On every slope there is a new bunch, a new bottle, a new taste.

It is a never-ending journey, always in pursuit of putting a little of that magic he experienced all those years ago into the glasses of Justerini & Brooks’ clients.
A few older bottles of Frog’s Leap…

A few older bottles of Frog’s Leap…

Wednesday 16th February 2022
by Julian Campbell

The biggest misconception about Frog’s Leap is that they’re often assumed to be a large-scale commercial operation. The truth is this is a family-owned winery producing just 45,000 cases per year across five cuvees. Far from looking to grow relentlessly, they are trimming production while simultaneously increasing their holdings of estate owned vineyards. John was one of the first people in the valley to adopt an organic approach in the vineyards and has been a great advocate for dry farming. And they are also great innovators in the winery. When it comes to thinking up new ways to produce ever more restrained, elegant wines, there no is no slavish devotion to oak barrels here… 

Sustainability at Justerini & Brooks

Sustainability at Justerini & Brooks

Tuesday 13th April 2021
by Julian Campbell

Working towards a better future


Drinking fine wine shouldn’t cost the Earth. While our environmental impact may be relatively small, we feel it’s right to minimise our carbon footprint in whatever way we can. Whether that’s asking suppliers to reduce the weight of their bottles or finding more sustainable packaging, we have a responsibility to find better solutions.

As a basic rule, our buyers only work with producers that make wines in ways that are both ethical and environmentally responsible. We are also a member of the Sustainable Restaurant Association, a dedicated community that aims to support foodservice businesses, suppliers, and discerning diners.

We also actively support beacons of sustainable winemaking. For example, we are now working with Felton Road in New Zealand, Frog’s Leap in Napa Valley, and Château de Meursault, which is soon to be the largest certified organic estate in the Côte d’Or.

And, while our buyers always try to use trains, some destinations still aren’t served from St Pancras… so we also offset all our business flights.

The little things matter too. For example, to improve our carbon footprint, we have partnered with distribution service Great Bear, which uses hybrid vans to deliver our wine. We also now send out tasting samples in more eco-friendly 50ml and 100ml bottles. 

2020 - A Few Good Bottles

2020 - A Few Good Bottles

Tuesday 22nd December 2020
by Julian Campbell

This year, perhaps more than any other, solace has been found in transportative bottles of great wine.

Without recourse to travelling, it has come down to the willingness of producers to send samples, and in that regard I’ve been blessed with some very accommodating winemakers who have been happy to fire bottles across the seas for me to taste in the comfort and (occasional) peace of my own home. In truth, there are many bottles that stand out as bright sparks of excitement in the muddle of 2020; Germany features heavily, so does Champagne, a little bit of South Africa, plenty of California, a handful of momentous, or just perfectly timed Burgundies and one particularly lovely bottle of single vineyard St Joseph that sang next to chicken with clementines, fennel and Pernod. What follows is a handful of especially bright spots – wines that made, to paraphrase Mr. McCartney, all our troubles seem so far away…

Vintage Report: Germany 2019 - Riesling’s Reign

Vintage Report: Germany 2019 - Riesling’s Reign

Friday 21st August 2020
by Julian Campbell

Riesling’s Reign 

Germany’s 2019 vintage is clearly rather special and has even been described as a potential “vintage of the century” by one commentator. However, had this label been bandied about at harvest time you’ve have been hard pressed to find a grower to confirm that view – over repeated zoom calls during the summer I was met with surprise and delight at how the vintage has turned out. From best-ever estate wines to aristocratic Grosses Gewächs, and many a luscious-yet-lively sweetie, there are some truly thrilling wines in this years’ 2019 offer. Stylistically it is a hard year to pigeonhole as overall the wines present a wonderfully complex and somewhat rare blend of intense minerality married to ripeness. As Frank Schönleber noted, the wines have “the flavours of a cool vintage allied to the structure of a warm one” - a decidedly delicious combination and one that is guaranteed to win many friends in the years to come. 

Cain Concept 2010 – Placing the Benchlands

Cain Concept 2010 – Placing the Benchlands

Tuesday 21st July 2020
by Julian Campbell

The inimitable Chris Howell from Cain Vineyards uses google maps to place both Cain Five and Cain Concept, two of Napa’s most interesting wines…


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