Posts with the label "2019"


A webinar with Nigel Greening of Felton Road

A webinar with Nigel Greening of Felton Road

Wednesday 30th September 2020
by Justerini & Brooks

A conversation with Nigel Greening of Felton Road and his 'benchmark' vintage...

Since purchasing Felton Road in 2000 owner Nigel Greening has overseen an incredible revolution at the estate, including an early move to organic and, later, biodynamic viticulture. Years of rigorous but environmentally respectful viticultural practices and sensitive, hands-off winemaking has elevated them to near legendary status in New Zealand fine wine circles. In the process of this meteoric rise, they have also become a worldwide fine wine beacon of sustainability.

Germany 2019 Webinar

Germany 2019 Webinar

Thursday 27th August 2020
by Justerini & Brooks

Justerini & Brooks invites you to a Germany 2019 Webinar 

Featuring Joh. Jos. Prüm, Fritz Haag, Schloss Lieser, Maximin Grünhaus, Willi Schaefer and Forstmeister Geltz Zilliken

Germany’s 2019 vintage is clearly rather special and has even been described as a potential “vintage of the century” by Michael Schmidt. From best-ever estate wines, to aristocratic Grosses Gewächs, and many a luscious-yet-lively sweetie, we’ve tasted some truly thrilling wines while putting our 2019 offer together. Stylistically it is a hard year to pigeonhole as overall the wines present a wonderfully complex and somewhat rare blend of intense minerality married to ripe acidity. As Frank Schönleber noted, the wines have “the flavours of a cool vintage allied to the structure of a warm vintage” - a decidedly delicious combination and one that is guaranteed to win many friends in the years to come.  Many growers likened the vintage to 2015, though with slightly less extract, less punch, and more classicism. It is in short, a vintage of wonderfully balanced, complex wines that showcases Riesling's finest attributes. You can read the full vintage report here.


Vintage Report: Germany 2019 - Riesling’s Reign

Vintage Report: Germany 2019 - Riesling’s Reign

Friday 21st August 2020
by Julian Campbell

Riesling’s Reign 

Germany’s 2019 vintage is clearly rather special and has even been described as a potential “vintage of the century” by one commentator. However, had this label been bandied about at harvest time you’ve have been hard pressed to find a grower to confirm that view – over repeated zoom calls during the summer I was met with surprise and delight at how the vintage has turned out. From best-ever estate wines to aristocratic Grosses Gewächs, and many a luscious-yet-lively sweetie, there are some truly thrilling wines in this years’ 2019 offer. Stylistically it is a hard year to pigeonhole as overall the wines present a wonderfully complex and somewhat rare blend of intense minerality married to ripeness. As Frank Schönleber noted, the wines have “the flavours of a cool vintage allied to the structure of a warm one” - a decidedly delicious combination and one that is guaranteed to win many friends in the years to come. 

2019 in the Mosel - Vintage report from  Weingut Willi Schaefer

2019 in the Mosel - Vintage report from Weingut Willi Schaefer

Wednesday 11th March 2020
by Julian Campbell

2019 in the Mosel - Vintage report from  Weingut Willi Schaefer

Yes – we are overjoyed about the results of harvest 2019! Currently, the young wines enchant us in all variations from our “village-level” to Beerenauslese. What we love most is the complexity, the detailed juicy-elegant character, the multilayered fruit flavors plus, of course, the distinct acidity. Of particular note is the complexity of our Auslese wines. Vintage 2019 also provided us with a GG (Grosses Gewächs), though we will release it at a later date.

South Africa: Brave New World (Part 2)

South Africa: Brave New World (Part 2)

Wednesday 10th April 2019
by Mark Dearing

Ten years ago, there were just four single-varietal Cinsaults on the market. Eben Sadie’s Pofadder, from schist soils around Riebeeck Casteel, was the most famous then, and probably still is now. 

However, today there are at least forty straight Cinsaults on the market and based on what I tasted, this feels like a sensible development. Not only is Cinsault accustomed to hot weather and dry conditions, it is a high yielding variety and regarded now as one of the main reasons why the Cape red blends of the mid-twentieth century have aged better than their modern Bordeaux-style counterparts. When delicately handled, Cinsault can be red fruit forward, spicy and succulent, with an authenticity built on tannin rather than acidity. While some examples, such as “Pofadder” manage to straddle complexity and depth with dancing aroma, most are best when produced in a primary, light and fruity style where the natural tannic grip stops short of astringency. A renewed focus on Cinsault in general means that the vineyards are generally either very young or very old (and thus increasingly hard to come by) as the unpopularity of Cinsault in the latter part of the twentieth century meant that new plantings ground to a halt. My preferred examples were Duncan Savage’s silky Follow the Line 2017 from alluvial soils around Darling and Blank Bottle’s My Koffer 2017, produced in homage to Tassenberg – a cheap Cinsault they drank lots of as students. The name My Koffer translates as “my suitcase” and represents the memories of the good-old-days stored within. From a vineyard in the Breedekloof, just outside Paarl, in a region dominated by co-operatives, this Cinsault is a wilder strawberry, herbal-spicy affair. Donovan Rall’s as yet unreleased 2018 from a vineyard on the border between Swartland and Darling is an incredibly satisfying juicy example aged for just 6-7 months in a combination of concrete and barrel.

Older Posts >