Posts with the label "cote de beaune"


Burgundy 2019 En Primeur: Côte de Beaune Webinar

Burgundy 2019 En Primeur: Côte de Beaune Webinar

Thursday 14th January 2021
by Giles Burke-Gaffney

Featuring Jean-Noël Gagnard, Génot-Boulanger and Château de Meursault.

In lieu of our annual Burgundy 2019 tasting, we hosted a Zoom webinar with three of the region’s greatest estates: Caroline Lestimé from Jean-Noël Gagnard, Guillaume Lavollée from Génot-Boulanger and Stéphane Follin-Arbelet from Château de Meursault. To view the wines in this years’ 2019 offer click here.

Burgundy 2019 in the words of our producers

Burgundy 2019 in the words of our producers

Wednesday 23rd December 2020
by Giles Burke-Gaffney

24 of Burgundy’s greatest domaines tell our Buying Director what they think of 2019 and attempt to compare it to another vintage….. 


Please join us for an exploration of the wines of the Côte de Beaune and the Côte de Nuits in January with some of Burgundy's top winemaking talent. 

To register for our webinars click here

Vintage Report: Burgundy 2019 - Incomparable!

Vintage Report: Burgundy 2019 - Incomparable!

Monday 21st December 2020
by Giles Burke-Gaffney

Incomparable!

It has been a year like no other, for all of the wrong reasons, but if there was a bright spot in the gloom of 2020, it has been tasting the delicious 2019 Burgundies. We have an excellent vintage on our hands, even “great” for many domaines.  

Vintage Report: Burgundy 2018

Vintage Report: Burgundy 2018

Tuesday 10th December 2019
by Giles Burke-Gaffney

 An extraordinary, record-breaking vintage that was as fascinating and enjoyable to taste as it was confounding.

The first thing to know about 2018 in Burgundy is that while it was the warmest year on record, when measured across the whole year, it was not extreme during the summer in the way that 2003 was. The second key to the vintage was the size of the crop -  2018 goes down as one of the biggest on record; a key mitigating factor to the summer warmth and drought. Finally, the winter of 2017/2018 was very wet and served to ensure that deep-lying water reserves were adequately filled at the start of the growing season.